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  1. #11
    Student
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Redondo Beach, CA
    Posts
    1
    I'm new to 3D printing but was intrigued enough by the carbon fiber capability (not chopped CF) when I saw it at SME's RAPID show last month that I ordered one. Amazingly (to what I was told up front), it will be here tomorrow.

    In noting that there are only two (2) current threads on the Mark One, seems I'm getting in on the ground floor. Which means I'm expecting to feel much like a beta tester very soon. Ouch!

    In reading this particular thread, I'm surprised that folks are commenting here - rather than on Eiger. Having not yet received my machine, I've been pushing on the sales side to provide info on MF's support for new users. Everything comes back to Eiger. So...are you folks up on Eiger? If not, why? If yes, what's there in the way of docs and tutorials?

    I'm particularly interested in instruction on CF layup procedures and embedding components. I'm having a hard time wrapping my mind around how the printer deals with shapes that get larger as you go up in Z - think of a small sphere. How does the nozzle get "under" the shape once the shape is placed, especially an embedded shape that is substantially taller than the gap between the last full layer and required height of the nozzle?

    Guess I'll start finding out come tomorrow and this weekend. Brave new world...

  2. #12
    The Mark One requires a minimum solid area of 1 square inch to place fiber. The area has to be continous (in most cases holes are not allowed to place fiber). Note as well the fiber is a continous strand for each layer (no fiber cuttings are allowed at one layer). This is limiting for many more complex geometries. Also there is a minimum width required to place at least one fiber ring, from my estimation it requires at least a 3mm thick wall. You have to take all that in consideration for designing your part.

    I still belive it is a great innovative product that will be improved in the close future by the research team. I have to say they have been very responsive to my support requests. My problems were solved in around 24 to 48 hs.

    Good luck!

  3. #13
    Why the one square inch rule? Is there some hard limit on either the material or the extrusion mechanism that makes it impossible or problematic to lay fiber in smaller areas?

  4. #14
    Now I'm finding that any part with more than a few cubic centimeters of fiber refuses to print at all. It takes fifteen minutes or more to generate the print job, then gives a vague error message. I'm beginning to question what exactly, if anything, this machine can do.

  5. #15
    We just ordered one. I had a sample part printed with CF. The part has .275 tabs that are .312 long and it filled them pretty well. I think the trick was to make sure the ends were rounded so the CF can make the corner. Even had a .175 hole that was .125 off of the edge of the part and CF made it around the hole. Part is 5" long with a large pocket and cutaway. came out .02 flat all the way across. The combination of tough Nylon and CF is very promising. Cant wait to try out the Kevlar and Fiberglass which should turn tighter corners. Had some .05 cross holes one with a .01 intersecting hole. the .05 holes came out ok but the .01 hole was a too small. I will try that again because it was only .075 off of the edge and I believe it didnt have enough room.

    Dimensionally the part came out really good with very little clean up and it is STIFF. held about .002 in all directions. The .175 through hole had a little Nylon that dripped inside but not bad.

    Used 28cm3 of Nylon and 2.81 of CF.

    I sent the local reseller a file they got on Friday morning and had a part in may hand Friday afternoon.

  6. #16
    Student MARKFORGED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    9
    Hey All,Apologies for being late to this thread... I can certainly help answer some of these questions.


    Quote Originally Posted by The Doof Kitty View Post
    Why the one square inch rule? Is there some hard limit on either the material or the extrusion mechanism that makes it impossible or problematic to lay fiber in smaller areas?



    Quote Originally Posted by juannadie View Post
    The Mark One requires a minimum solid area of 1 square inch to place fiber. The area has to be continous (in most cases holes are not allowed to place fiber). Note as well the fiber is a continous strand for each layer (no fiber cuttings are allowed at one layer).



    There isn't exactly a 1 square inch rule, but there is a minimum fiber length per layer that basically equals 1 sq inch if doing something like a disc or rectangle (with no holes). The min fiber length per layer is actually about 612mm, which is the distance from the fiber cutting assembly and the printhead (since we effectively use a bowden system). Smaller parts can be tricky, but we are actively working on ways to mitigate the constraints and optimize printing. As I'm sure you've noticed, our software team is constantly updating Eiger with new features and optimizations. We hope to have more info soon.




    Quote Originally Posted by juannadie View Post
    This is limiting for many more complex geometries. Also there is a minimum width required to place at least one fiber ring, from my estimation it requires at least a 3mm thick wall. You have to take all that in consideration for designing your part.



    The minimum wall thickness can vary, and sometimes be optimized by the FFF nylon settings (check out the support articles next time you have a minute). Basically the wall thickness is defined by the walls (shells) and fiber. Each nylon wall is equal to .4mm, and the fiber is about 1mm when printed., so you can effectively print ~2mm wall thickness (.4mm + 1mm + .4mm) so long as you meet the min. fiber requirement of ~612mm. We have 2 walls as the default (for better overall printing/quality), which is why you correctly pointed out the default ~3mm thickness ((2x.4mm) + 1mm + (2x .4mm)).



    Quote Originally Posted by I_CON View Post
    We just ordered one. I had a sample part printed with CF. The part has .275 tabs that are .312 long and it filled them pretty well. I think the trick was to make sure the ends were rounded so the CF can make the corner.


    This can be correct in some cases. Carbon is super stiff and brittle, so it can't always make certain bends. If you have parts that require hard corners, Kevlar or Fiberglass works very well.

    If the part is designed for these constraints, you can actually print rings of fiber around holes to reinforce – which is actually much better than drilling through and terminating the fibers like you would with traditional composites.





    Big thanks to you all for contributing to this community, and please keep the feedback coming. Feel free to PM me or file a support request for specific feedback, so we can get it on our roadmap.


    Thank you,
    Jeff

  7. #17
    Same problem I have with the reinforcing layers. Flat parts work well but I tried a couple of relativelly simple 3D parts and it didn't work.

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