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View Poll Results: Robo R1 or Da Vinci Pro 3-in-1

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  • Robo R1

    1 100.00%
  • Da Vinci Pro 3-in-1

    0 0%
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  1. #1

    Robo R1 vs DaVinci Pro 3-in-1

    Does anyone have or have used these printers? I'm looking at both, and swaying more towards the Di Vinci for the 3D scanning ability, but the R1 has a larger build...does anyone have any suggestions on which to go with? I will be using this for mostly prototypes. Thanks

  2. #2
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    don't expect the scanner aspect to be much good.
    Personally i'd go for the robo - out of those 2.

  3. #3
    Technologist
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    A fellow in our makerspace has the Robo 1 and absolutely loves the printer. The quality of the prints he shows is good and the printer has been generally reliable. He's lost the heated bed and doesn't care, although I've offered to help him troubleshoot the problem. He likes the printer sufficiently to want to purchase a second one, but they don't appear on the market much anymore. The newer models don't appeal to him at all.

    I've worked on the printer with him, although I can't recall why. It's easy to take apart for any reason, as the outer shell is decorative only.

    I've not read anything good about the DaVinci, but that's just a vague recollection.

  4. #4
    I'm going to go with the R1. The choices of filament that it can run sells it for me.

    Another question, does anyone know anything about using sublimation printing with 3D printed parts? I have a customer that wants a 3D printed cup for a prototype, but wants to use sub printing to make logos on it and such. I have no clue if it will work with 3D or not, since I'm still new to this.

  5. #5
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    If the process to be used is dye sublimation printing, there is the consideration that layer lines might cause the film to bubble or entrap air bubbles in the valleys of the layers. If the model being printed is smoothed after printing, and has a uniform surface, it might not be as problematic. The above reference was based on commercial printing equipment. I have also found a maker type resource: https://www.wikihow.com/Dye-Sublimat...m-Printed-Mugs

    This indicates that 204 deg C is used to apply the film. The drawing shows a pressure device being used. Expect that after the noted three minutes, the PLA or ABS is likely to be squished into an unrecognizable shape! PLA conducts heat fairly well and will distribute it through the mug, making the whole thing turn into mush.

    You can soften PLA under hot water, so 204 deg C isn't going to be healthy for the mug. I expect that commercial versions of this printing device will be as hot.
    Last edited by fred_dot_u; 11-26-2018 at 12:45 PM.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    what fred said.
    The dyeing thing probably won't work.
    Also the mug will probably not be water tight unless you make it completely solid.

    bear in mind that when slicers say infill is 100% - they lie :-)
    To get a completely solid item in simpify3d you set infill to 100% (which bizarrely, is still a mesh) - but more importantly you tell it to use a solid diaphragm every layer - and that's the one that produces solid objects.
    I have a bird water tray screwed into a bottle. Totally watertight.
    Any other settings I've tried have never been watertight.
    So bear that in mind :-)

  7. #7
    Thanks for the info guys. The 3D proto is only for visual, not to be used as an actual cup, if that helps. I was looking at using a PETG or something for the print since the R1 can run it. I'm thinking that the printing won't work for what he's trying to do...

  8. #8
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    you can get high heat pla that's good up to 110c.
    Not cheap, but might be worth a try.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by curious aardvark View Post
    you can get high heat pla that's good up to 110c.
    Not cheap, but might be worth a try.
    Any suggestions?

  10. #10
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    Would 110 deg C plastic hold up to a 204 deg C heater for 3 minutes?

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