Last summer, electronics distribution company Mouser Electronics, together with celebrity engineer and inventor Grant Imahara, put college students, makers, and engineers to the 3D design test, and issued a challenge to create a 3D printable electronic object that could actually be printed, and used, in space, on the Made In Space zero-gravity 3D printer aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The challenge winners were announced in late 2016, and Imahara, together with fellow judge and former ISS commander Chris Hadfield, looked through close to 250 design ideas before deciding on the winners. Engineer Andy Filo, from Cupertino, California, was the grand prize winner, with his 3D printable femtosatellite-launching device. Filo was awarded a 3D printer, valued at about $500, but the more exciting prize happened earlier this month - Imahara and Mouser Electronics announced that his design has been successfully 3D printed on the ISS. Read more at