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  1. #1

    What have you done to filter out the toxic particles generated from 3D Printer?

    Hello, I plan to buy a large volume 3D printer to use at home. Brand has not been determined yet but most likely Raise3D N2+, Afinia H800+ (Up Box+) or Ultimaker 3 Extended. The problem is that the ventilation system in my bedroom is not good. I can only slide a small window in my condo and the air could blow the particles to other areas of my apartment rather than blowing them out. I could put it in the bathroom and have the fan on. However, due to the size of the printer, I cannot keep the door closed. I am also not sure if the ventilation fan in the bathroom is effective enough to take out those harmful particles.

    I heard that even when printing using PLA, some kind of toxic particles are generated which could cause cancer. Has any user done anything to filter out those toxic particles? Any filtration system that I could put next to the printer to absorb those harmful particles? Pictures showing the setup would be nice.


    How effective is the filter system within the Afinia H800+ printer?


    I talked to a reseller of Raise3D. He suggested making a hole at the back of the printer and install a fan in it. Then, connect the hole to the window using flexible aluminum pipe. Not sure if that would affect the print quality or void the warranty.

  2. #2
    Unless you know for certain the exit location of the bathroom fan, that option should be rejected. Our bathroom fans exit into the attic, which damages the insulation with moisture. We have them disconnected for that reason. Not good for ventilating a 3D printer either!

    You have a couple of options for constructing a ventilation/filtration system. To prevent localized airflow from compromising the print quality, you'll want to have large volumes of air moving slowly compared to fast moving small volume. This means a large enclosure for the printer, which may not be practical.

    Consider instead that you can build a ducting system to the window similar to the manner you suggest, but the fan should be large, perhaps floor-fan or window-fan sized. A common size in the US is a 20" box fan. You could place the fan with the exhaust aimed to the window, but placed close to the printer. It will "collect" air from around the area of the printer without creating fast moving cooling on your part. On the output side of the fan, plastic sheeting tapering to a box to match the window opening will direct the blown air, compressing it slightly before it exits the window. If you can match the window duct to the fan size or make it larger, all the better.

    Some people will create a box on the exit of the fan, and build filters into the walls of the box. Carbon filters (expensive) are pretty effective in removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) if the filter is so marked on the packaging.

    Some people will also create an enclosure, either exhausting to the window or to a filter box, but keep the air flow to a lower figure, in order to prevent the inappropriate cooling of the printed part.

  3. #3
    Thanks for your expert opinion. Although the 3D printer dealer suggested making a hole at the back of the case and put a fan inside, the manufacturer mentioned that doing so will void the warranty and as you mentioned, it could affect the print quality.

    As I live in a condo, making a hole in the window is also out of option. The most I can do is to just put the opening of the aluminum duct to face the window. For a large printer such as the Raise 3D+, is there another way? Perhaps have some kind of filter put inside the machine perhaps below the filament area or on the big plastic cover on top?

    How effective it is if I get a large bag of Carbon filter and use it to cover the entire printer? Not sure how effective such "passive?" method is. Note that there are four fans in this printer. Two at the extruders, one at the bottom of the machine and one at the side or back. If the Carbon filter bag is long enough to touch the floor, not sure if it would affect the circulation and cause damage to the printer. However, if I cover the printer up to the top of the casters, those nano particles could move around the apartment.
    Last edited by new3dprintinguser; 02-02-2018 at 10:12 PM.

  4. #4
    Technologist Roberts_Clif's Avatar
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    How about a window vented AC Duct

    https://www.repairclinic.com/PartDet...735401/2754508

    Remember you have a 3D Printer 3D Print your own, wanted to give you an Ideal.

    I went with a thru the wall with a bathroom vent without a filter, was thinking about using 65mm gas mask filters and recirculating the air.
    I however live is a very dusty prairie environment and finally decided on the aforementioned Bathroom fan vent.

    Placed both 3D Printers inside a negative air pressure case. Negative air pressure environmental chambers can allow the chamber to be partially open, allowing for outside air to be drawn in and not allow the inside air to escape thru the opening. We only need a little negative air so don't run the fan full speed only enough to move air outside. I Use this manner you can vent the chamber air to the outside thru a window vent as shown above. If you want you could vent this thru a hepa filter of any vacuum cleaner. I even thought a filtering thru a 65mm gas mask filter back into the chamber.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Roberts_Clif; 02-03-2018 at 08:16 AM.

  5. #5
    Thanks Roberts but the Raise3D N2+ is so big that I don't have the room to make a even bigger chamber to cover it.
    The condo management also does not allow people to fool around with the installed windows.

    Anybody knows if putting a HERA purifier next to the 3D printer could do the job of sucking in those toxic particles?

    P.S. I tried to upload photos but the system does not allow me to. Know what is wrong? I tried jpeg and png.
    Last edited by new3dprintinguser; 02-03-2018 at 10:32 AM.

  6. #6
    Technologist Roberts_Clif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by new3dprintinguser View Post
    Thanks Roberts but the Raise3D N2+ is so big that I don't have the room to make a even bigger chamber to cover it.
    The condo management also does not allow people to fool around with the installed windows.

    Anybody knows if putting a HERA purifier next to the 3D printer could do the job of sucking in those toxic particles?

    P.S. I tried to upload photos but the system does not allow me to. Know what is wrong? I tried jpeg and png.
    Your problem is so simple and still you ask for help to figure it out.

    Bye the way it is a "High efficiency particulate air (HEPA)" no not know what a HERA filter is.

    Your problem is as simple as making a new top noise cover. You can make if the any material, I would go with smokey Plexiglas or Lexan sign face material.
    Duplicating a facsimile of the original top thereby giving you area to enclose your air purifier.

    1st. The case is not completely air tight if you flow the air inside thru a filter to exhaust clean air into the room. Choose filters carefully or your whole condo will smell.
    2nd. As all the air will be enclosed in the case you merely recirculate the air thru an internal filtering system enclosed in the top sound hat.







  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Roberts_Clif View Post
    Your problem is so simple and still you ask for help to figure it out.

    Bye the way it is a "High efficiency particulate air (HEPA)" no not know what a HERA filter is.

    Your problem is as simple as making a new top noise cover. You can make if the any material, I would go with smokey Plexiglas or Lexan sign face material.
    Duplicating a facsimile of the original top thereby giving you area to enclose your air purifier.

    1st. The case is not completely air tight if you flow the air inside thru a filter to exhaust clean air into the room. Choose filters carefully or your whole condo will smell.
    2nd. As all the air will be enclosed in the case you merely recirculate the air thru an internal filtering system enclosed in the top sound hat.





    Thanks. Could you please explain what "top noise cover" is? Any photo or drawing to illustrate what you suggested?

  8. #8
    Technologist Roberts_Clif's Avatar
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  9. #9
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    Have a look at Protopro Web site. I bought an enclosure recently and it works very well.
    Rod

  10. #10
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    Improvements using full enclosures. No Fumes

    Quote Originally Posted by new3dprintinguser View Post
    Thanks. Could you please explain what "top noise cover" is? Any photo or drawing to illustrate what you suggested?
    I bought an enclosure from PROTOPRO and also a filter they both work really well with good control over temperature. The sound level is better. Protopro also make water cooled hot ends which will be my next improvement. This should double the speed of print. I have a 8 year old denford UP printer which is ancient but still works well.
    Rod

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