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  1. #11
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    I had registered that for POOR adhesion.....but now it sounds even more tempting

  2. #12
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    yeah people don't realise that releasing a print is actually much more of an issue than gettign it to stick.
    Lost count of the time I had prints richocheting around the room.
    And with pva I generally had to reheat the bed to get a scraper under the print.

    With printbite you can either wait till the bed has cooled down - at which point it just lifts off, or if you're impatient (like me) - hit it with a hammer :-) A sharp tap usually knocks it loose.
    Well I say hammer. I have a printed viking axe that I use the back of and a long handled hard flexible pla hammer I designed that i also use.
    The beauty is that even prints with delicate and intricate thin layers just lift off.

    Like everything you have to get the settings right for your machine and filaments. But unless something truly miraculous comes out, I won't use anything else.

    I can thoroughly recommend flashforge filament off amazon for use with printbite.
    Plus it's cheap too and very good filament.

  3. #13
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    Printbite currently not available ..... website soon to be updated. So I guess I will just have to hold fire until the stuff is available again

  4. #14
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    pva is pretty good.
    Use the cheap gluesticks from the pound shops.

    heat the bed and apply 3-4 layers - let it dry between each application, only takes aminute or so. It will dry into a plastic sheet that most things stick to quite well.

    releases reasonably easily. I used to heat the bed so i could get a thin scraper under a corner of the piece and it usually came off fairly easily after that.

  5. #15
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    Thanks for the tip I'll pick up a few cheap gluesticks and see how that goes

  6. #16
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    Right...well...

    on the good side..I found a place that had some PrintBite in stock. So I have a piece on the way!

    On the less good side, I have been discovering the limitations of 3D printed parts in terms of strength.

    I had reached the point on my tank suspension where I just needed to make the shocks and I had a basic one unit of the 8 made, and could then just run off the other 7 without worry. If I made the thing vertically on the bed, I got a lovely looking part ...that would snap easily. If I made it horizontally on the bed, it was a lot stronger, but looked like crap. I have had to abandon any thought of hte shock shaft being printed and have instead just made the shock ends parts in plastic and will use a steel shock shaft screwed into the plastic. Should work just fine .... but will be a bit more fiddly. I have made small pilot holes in the parts so I can drill them to size and screw in the shock shaft.

    I also found some interesting issues while trying to print the wheels.

    1) If I made the sides too thick, I had real issues with the early layers curling up on the bed, meaning the back of the wheel ( bed side ) was not flat but bowed badly around the edges. I cured this easy enough playing with the layers...increasing the back layers and reducing hte side layers whilst also reducing the fill %. I also slowed the speed a little. This seemed to give it more time to cool between layers and let them form better. I will get some photos up once I have assembled the whole thing and fitted some springs. Overall I am happy with the fit and finish

    2) The higher the fill% the harder they were to get off the bed. I presume it reduces flex, making it harder to detach from the bed. Reducing fill% helped a lot here and the wheels popped off nicely.

    I have also hit 'that' point.

    Yes....the point where people start to find out you have a 3D printer and 'they have this thing that broke...can you print one!'

    My first 'friend' project will be to make a camera tripod some new adjustment knobs as the originals have split and turn on their own.

  7. #17
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    For stronger parts with pla - print it hotter.
    210-215 gives best layer adhesion with pla.

    It might also be worth looking at pet-g. This has seriously good inter layer strength. Prints pretty easily. Little hotter and slower than pla - but a vertical piece is as strong as a horizontal piece.

  8. #18
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    Thanks more stuff to experiment with!

    I have been printing around the 190-200 mark at present so I will ramp it up a bit and see if that improves.

    To be fair, by modifying the design of the parts I have been playing with to print the shock parts thicker, with me drilling out the hole I have got a better result than trying to print the hole to correct dimensions. Presumably, the greater heat buildup from the thicker cross section has given me better adhesion. I'll do a couple of prints at different temps and see how the strength varies.

    Also...my PrintBite has arrived .... and will get a test later on.

    When I get the 'broken' camera part I can work out what to do to print that too

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