Close



Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1

    viscous/fluid materials

    Hi folks,

    For a project at university we need a 3D printer that can print a fluid material, it will harden once out of the printer. If possible we don't wont to spend 200k for a bioprinter. And as far as I can see printers like MakerBots couldn't handle something liquid, right?


    Note: I now look around some more, and the problem with resin printers like Form2 is that what I want to print is not a photopolymer...I kinda want a printer that works like a filament extruder but instad of the filament has some kind of "bag" with my liquid in it, that it can compress and print out of the nozzle.

    Best regards and thanks for your help,
    Soia
    Last edited by soiasosse; 04-11-2017 at 03:04 AM.

  2. #2
    You mean something like this

    http://www.keep-art.co.uk/Self_build.html

    A ceramic paste extruder

  3. #3
    Yes, but I'd need high resolution so I'd rather have something commercial. Maybe we can buy the Inkredible Bioprinter, if this really works for 5k (university price) that seems to be quite fair.
    But I'll also have a look if I find something interesting googeling for ceramic paste extruder
    Thanks alot

    cheers,
    Soia

  4. #4
    Engineer Marm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    635
    Add Marm on Thingiverse
    Sounds like another XY problem to me.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Marm View Post
    Sounds like another XY problem to me.
    Hm, since I am at the very start of 3D printing this did not occur to me, but you might be right. So let me rephrase it.
    I intend to squeez a material with the viscosity of honey through a nozzle. This I would like to do with Z stacks of approx. 100um (The object will have a final height of 1-2mm). And of course I would like this to be an automated process, where I can make a CAD file to be read and printed. The material will solidify once its on the building platform.
    Is there a cheap (up to circa 3000$) 3D Printer that can do this?

    Best,
    Soia

  6. #6
    Engineer Marm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    635
    Add Marm on Thingiverse
    I think you're still in XY territory, but much better. Props for understanding that too.

    Why a viscous liquid? In order for a liquid to stay where you want it to, it will either need a catalyst to harden, or go through a phase change, which complicates the whole process. What is preventing this hardening in the tank/extruder?

    Does the end product require this particular material? Are there other materials, that while maybe not as ideally suited as your the liquid, that will simplify the production process, lower costs, and work almost as well by staying within tolerances/specs? If so, then you might want to look in that direction.

    If not, well, we should be able to help you figure out what you need. But I'm thinking we'll need some more info on exactly this material is, and the conditions it must endure for production.

  7. #7
    Thanks, okey so the problem is that my liquid is bio-compatible but not biodegradable, and so far I haven't found much else that has these properties (+possibility of hardening).
    I think I will be able to change the viscosity to that of toothpaste so that it stays put until I apply the catalyst for it to harden (it needs two components to harden and in the tank is only one). But you are of course right that for initial experiments I could use some kind of Bioink, to test things out.
    To whole print process should take place at room temperature or not higher than 35C.

    Best,
    Soia

  8. #8
    Staff Engineer Davo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    989
    Follow Davo On Twitter Add Davo on Facebook Add Davo on Google+ Add Davo on Shapeways Add Davo on Thingiverse
    At Hyrel, we have equipment which performs to your specifications.

    See:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmw0LS_f9V0

    and

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XREWb_Md5o0

    and

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aR4d-2BZj_Y

    PM me if you would like a live demonstration via skype.

  9. #9
    Staff Engineer
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    850
    It sounds like you need to develop a material that will either stay in place when deposited and slowly harden, or harden immediately upon deposition. FDM printing works because certain thermoplastics harden so quickly after being melted and extruded. A clay-like material would be an example of the former. But there's only so much weight that an unhardened "toothpaste" material will support before it starts sagging - you can try it yourself next time you're brushing your teeth.

    If the material you have in mind needs a catalyst to harden, you might think about extruding both the resin and catalyst through a mixing nozzle, like the ones used to dispense epoxy: http://www.techni-tool.com/512AC441?...170411205942:s

  10. #10
    Staff Engineer Davo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    989
    Follow Davo On Twitter Add Davo on Facebook Add Davo on Google+ Add Davo on Shapeways Add Davo on Thingiverse
    Yes, awerby. Hyrel has heads which accept static blending baffled nozzles like that with fixed or programmable ratios. UV crosslinking photoinitiation can also be used when appropriate.

    For mixing heads with programmable ratios, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQj6oLfrbLo

    For UV photoinitiation, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h95IurET7UM
    Last edited by Davo; 04-11-2017 at 04:15 PM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •