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  1. #1

    HRL Laboratories' Ceramic Resin

    The use of ceramics in 3D printing has thus far been pretty limited; the current method of sintering creates porous materials that are prone to breakage, limiting 3D printed ceramics to small, mostly decorative pieces. HRL Laboratories has just changed that with a new ceramic resin for 3D printing. The resin, which is ten times stronger than other 3D printable ceramic materials, can withstand temperatures of over 1700 degrees Celsius and has the potential to be used in the manufacturing of hypersonic jets. Read more at 3DPrint.com: http://3dprint.com/113532/hrl-labs-3d-ceramic-resin/

  2. #2
    Engineer-in-Training ServiceXp's Avatar
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    This would be freaking awesome if this could be developed for FMD printers... and affordable..

  3. #3
    Student
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    Gothenburg, Sweden
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    In witch ceramic materials will this be possible?
    Zirkonium oxide?

  4. #4
    This technology is very exciting. Boeing and General Motors are obviously aimed at applications for aerospace and automotive, but I would like to suggest a new field, lightweight vertical structures. Skyscrapers and high-rises are vertical, but not lightweight. I have invented a component-based system (see www.towerdome.com) that uses icosahedral trusses to efficiently support weight above ground. 3D printing components with this technology could produce microlattice struts, beams, floor panels, etc. that are both lightweight and extremely strong. Silicon carbide and oxycarbide elements are plentiful, and the materials would be durable, bio-inert, and resistant to fires. Price is of course an issue, probably related to the energy cost of pyrolyzation; hopefully the economics of scale can make this available.
    I am an independent inventor, a software engineer with a background in mechanical and metallurgy. I'm looking for a company or consortium that I can work with to R&D distributed structures that have potentially unlimited vertical extent. Please respond with comments and/or suggestions. Thanks very much in advance.

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