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  1. #1

    If you have a dual extruder please give me the dirt. Good? bad? wish you didnt?

    I'm new to it- I got a used stratasys dimension. dual type- one filament for model one for support. But- the canister that holds the filament has a microchip in it that the printer reads--and sets the heat.I cant put a lower temp water soluble filament in the support canister- it runs at 210.I am trying to figure out if i need to blow 4 grand on the ultimaker--or go cheapand dont say BIBO!! been there-- still hurting from itthanks for your inputhappy plinking!

  2. #2
    I've got a Raise3D E2 and I am very happy with its dual extruder independant temperature capabilities to alter settings from one extruder to the other.
    Not a cheap printer by any means, but less than the Ultimaker you priced.

    It's also virtually a plug and play machine with included settings for different filaments and the only bad prints so far over about seven reels of Raise PLA have been down to operator error. Also got a decent bed size.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    you should be able to find a chip hack for the stratasys online somewhere.

    If you will buy from a machine from a company notorious for both the cost of their materials and their totally locked down infrastructure.
    well, you get what you pay for :-)

    The flashforge and qidi dual extruders - based on the replicator pro design - are pretty good.
    There are inherent issues with the two nozzles together style of extruder. But onve you get them calibrated - they generally work very well.

    these days I'd be looking at an idex setup like bikeracers got.
    There are a lot around from about $600 on up to whatever you want to pay.

    I still feel ultimakers are a lot of money for what you get, but they are good machines and generally do what it says on the tin :-)
    For the same money - or less - there are much bigger and better machines around.
    Last edited by curious aardvark; 11-11-2020 at 08:36 AM.

  4. #4
    i own a cnc machine shop. specialize in working with design engineers to develop thier new products. they send thier "concept" and we refine it into a component or assembly that can be manufactured--economically as possible. The design engineers dont often know "IF" things can be machined ot cast. We help them out. Then machine the components for thier vreation so they can test it and send it to UL for approval. I also have a friend that owns a bronze foundry. I've been printing lost was type patterns for him. Refining the shape/ form in zbrush cad and maya into a form that will cast and burn out nicely. I use the stratasys for that--first print last print every print--is magnificent. perfect every time. I ordered the bibo for running or printing smaller models of these concepts -- to more accurately visualize-- on a screen in cad-- can fool you. it helps to print the components -- hold it in your hand etcetera. we both bought 1 of the bibo dual extruders- steel case- heavy--a good fit for machine shop and foundry environments. I recieved mine first. the harpoon story is above, He finally after 3 weeks of going back and forth with bibo- edits- firmware- trying to get cura to work--finally--But he finally got it printing! If you want to call it that. the prints are hodeous! when one extruder is printing the other extruder is oozing gooplets- that then get dragged into the model. .bibo says lower the temp. he tried and tried- cant stp the gooping and still keep a print going hot enough to extrude. He is sending it back to amazon also.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    see now - why didn't you start with that in your other thread ? Rather than come across like a nutter with a disease fetish ?

    Yeah the stratasys machines do have a reputation for plug and play.
    I guess you need to offset that against the ongoing costs and the total lockdown of their 'system'.

    And like I said the standard dual extruder setup - can be a real sod if it's not absolutely perfectly setup and calibrated.
    The oozing is usualy dealt with by a huge amount of wasted plastic in a purge wall.
    And it really does depend entirely on what slicer you are using.
    I have never once, in over 5 years, mamaged to get simplify3d to get my rep clone to produce an acceptable dual nozzle print.
    Whereas with flashforge's flashprint - it's an absolute doddle and works great every time.

    IDEX machines are quite different - and while you still have the ooze issues - as you are not dealing with two nozzles that cannot be seperated - the unused nozzle can bugger off out of the way and ooze in peace on the sidelines. Then the nozzle is wiped before that head returns to print. Essentially you have the advantages of as single extruder setup - but with the ability to use two materials at once.

    From your point of view - the ultimaker might be the better option. They are optimised to run with cura (so you don't have to do all the fiddling about that non-ultimaker cura users have to do) and they are most often sold for light industrial service.
    You do pay the 'industry/business' premium. But if they didn't do the job - people wouldn't pay it.

    And they're still cheaper than stratasys and do not have a locked down system - quite the opposite.

    We don't get that many ultimaker owners round here - and as 80% oif the threads on here are: 'I have this problem...'
    That's probably a very good indication that most ultimaker owners, don't rebuild their machines every 10 minutes, have to modify them or have many issues in general.

    I'll put in a word for the Leapfrog bolt :-)
    It remains my all time favourite fdm printer and one of the sturdiest builds I've ever seen.
    It's expensive - but awesome :-)
    https://www.lpfrg.com/products/leapfrog-bolt-pro/

    Bikeracer2000 has really high standards and does not tolerate things that don't work - and if he's happy, that's a pretty good recommendation.
    We also don't get many raise3d owners round here - so same criteria applies as to ultimaker.
    Last edited by curious aardvark; 11-17-2020 at 10:03 AM.

  6. #6
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    I have seen where some use a servo for each nozzle mounted to the side of the extruder with a piece of a soda can bent like an L. When the extruder being used gets used it moves the tin away from the nozzle. When it is not in use the servo moves the piece of tin to block the unused nozzle. I went looking through thingiverse for you and did not find anything along these lines specific to your BIBO so you might have to get creative and make something yourself. Here is someone's design for this function on a different dual extruder printer. Look closely at all the pictures and get busy with the rapid prototyping: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2777682 I actually think the design in the link I sent you has the tin hard mounted and it moves the nozzle to and away from the tin for printing. A little different but the same.

  7. #7
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    Alternatively I found these plans for a 3 motor setup to drive a corexy idex setup. They look legit. Someone just has to build it to see..

    They are not my plans, I found them here: https://reprap.org/forum/read.php?397,714601

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