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Thread: My First CoreXY

  1. #91
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    I am pretty sure this will be my first experience with Klipper. I ordered the big tft70 v3.0 before I had that thought and now it is a step above useless as I understand Klipper does not like the tft's. I say a step above because I think I can still use it as a 7" lcd12864 display. blah. but it's paid for and puts it to use so that's what this rig gets. I will mount a pi 4 behind the screen and hope to God I am not making a bad choice. I am not good with the python or the putty or the linux. But I really want to try input shaper and using an accelerometer mounted to my extruder to tune accelerations. All the videos I watch on the klipper they are using a tablet to communicate with the printer. I look forward to doing that. I have years spent all with Marlin. First with arduino, then with Atom, and recently just PlatformIO.

  2. #92
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    if you had a crossbar - you could attach the screen to it :-)

    As far as pla versus petg - I did an experiment a short while back. To compare tempered pla to untempered pla.

    Did a hollow cylinder with base and a square container.
    Did each at 2mm wall and 1.2 mm wall.
    Of the four un-tempered prints - only the 1.2mm cylinder was NOT watertight.
    And I had to leave that overnight to see any leakage.
    Surprised me.

    All the tempered parts are watertight.
    And all parts were printed at 0.3mm and 150mm/s
    I haven't done the temperature tests yet.

    But I can say that none of my pla prints break at layer points.
    Even the 'aluminium' extrusion i designed and printed at 0.4mm and 150mm/s on the delta - only breaks with diagonal or uneven breaks.

    The problem with that kind of article is that they are not using your printer or your settings or the brand of pla you use.
    And they are probably sponsored by someone makinging pet-g ;-)

    The precision of the sapphire pro 2 has definitely improved the watertightnesss of my prints, to the extent that pretty much everything it prints is watertight.
    As to throwing it at the ground - pla prints usually bounce. My workshop floor is concrete - the only broken prints I get are the ones I forget to pick up and that the dog chews up :-)

    For anything that needs added toughness I suck it up - timewise - and use PET.
    It'll print well at 70mm/s and 235c, to give a print tougher than pet-g and almost as rigid as pla.

    But I don't actually see where being watertight and bouncy - has any bearing on a structural support for a 3d printer ?
    Surely the prime requirement would be hardness and rigidity. Which pet-g does not have.

    Also think how much time you'd save using pla :-)
    Last edited by curious aardvark; 05-08-2021 at 09:42 AM.

  3. #93
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    Well fwiw my Prusa MMU2S that I bought from Prusa Research for a little over $300 came to me printed in PETG. When I goto ebay to buy a NEMA 17 motor mount it is either ABS or PETG. I used PLA as long as I could not because it was the best filament but because it was the easiest to use. It was a placebo. But I use and very much work hard the parts I make. I have never been happier than since I started using PETG. Because I am now printing the same quality parts I used to buy for a premium.

    And here is Prusa Research telling you to print their parts with PETG if you are to print their parts: Original Prusa printable parts - Prusa3D - 3D Printers from Josef Pr?ša

  4. #94
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    There are two main rationales I am familar with for preferring PETG/ABS over PLA for 3D printed parts.

    The first is temperature, but the second is creep (or cold flow). PLA generally deforms more when placed under long term stress.
    E.g., http://thrinter.com/creep-abs-pla-petg-alloy-910/
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33322445/

  5. #95
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  6. #96
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    I gotta say at this point that almost every material from every manufacturer will behave differently because even though it says PLA, PETG or ASA on the box, there isn’t just one PLA, one PETG or one ASA. Depending on manufacturer, the raw material, compositions and additives deviate and that will influence printability as well as performance and this is also why there are $10 PLAs as well as $50 PLAs on the market. Also the printer, print setting and environment changes properties.
    that's probably the most relevant point of the entire blog.

    the pet-g i have is actually creality own brand - so, yeah lol
    But it's way too soft for any kind of practical useage where rigidity is important.

    And apart from the sink strainer where pla really did not like boiling water poured over it regulary. My pla prints have always outperfoirmed both abs and the pet-g I have.
    The pet-g sink strainer is working great - no obvious issues with the boiling water.

    So for heat deflection - yep pet-g (although I have yet to try pet and boiling water).
    But most other things. nah :-)
    I even used flexible pla in the pond pump couplings.
    After about 4 years of being nibbled and crapped on by fish - still look and function good as new.

    I've shifted to tpu these days. simply because it's improved a lot over the last few years and it's cheap and while it isn't any stronger than the flexible pla - it IS elastic, so really difficult to deform even really thin parts.
    And the stiffness is now where I like it.

    The cnc kitchen test came out with pla being stiffest and strongest - so best for structural parts.
    It doesn't like being hit with a hammer or boiled alive - but apart from that - better than the other two all round.

    I've got a feeling I tried some asa a while back and it stank just like abs. Might give it another go.
    110c is good enough for a hot water meat mould - don't ask lol
    I must have some samples in here somewhere, I'll have a look through the 'tct free filament archives'.

    But the interesting thing is that his printing temps are a lot higher than mine as well as his speeds being generally lower.
    Well he doesn't mention speeds - but the preset prusa settings do tend to print really slow (by my standards).

    pla at 215c - nope, all the pla I've tried that hot really doesn't like it.

    So as previously mentioned - 3d printing is still as much an art as it is a science.
    But pla is still best for structural parts.

  7. #97
    Hmm, good idea!

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