Close



Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Smile First Time Buyer help

    Hello,

    I'm working on a research project and I need to buy some filament for use with the Ultimaker 2+. I'm looking to buy one, maybe two filaments with the following applications.


    1st application
    Less friction with metal (I do not know, are there 3D print materials that slide on metal easier than others?)
    Does not need to be strong
    Relatively cheap compared to average spools

    2nd application
    Needs to not break under load! (One of my parts will be holding a bearing for a 0.5 inch diameter steel axle which will experience some moments, it holds the steering stub after a U-Joint)
    I'm OK with slightly above the average spool price

    Can anyone help me out with filament name/suppliers? I'm so new to 3D printing, I don't even own the Ultimaker but I need to use it :O

    Thanks so much in advance!

  2. #2
    Side note: I MOSTLY need the 2nd application filament! I can always use it for the weaker parts as well

  3. #3
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    7,957
    well you can try some pet-g - i=get the the print settings right and it's incredibly strong - also relatively easy to print, compared to things like polycarbonate anyway.

    Also you might want to look at carbonfibre infused nylon.
    Stupidky tough, both nylon and carbon should give great low friction sliding.
    The donwside is that nyl,on can be a right bastard to print.

    taulman nylon 230 is probably the easiest to print I've ever tried.
    No it's not cheap - but you don't get miracles for peanuts.
    And it does come in 3mm - not everything does :-)
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Taulman-Nyl.../dp/B078MPR375

    And yes there are much cheaper 'nylons' out there - BUT ALL NYLON IS NOT THE SAME !!!
    Huge differences between them - cheap nylon will 100% be a total bastard to use.

    But it does fill both criteria in one material.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by curious aardvark View Post
    well you can try some pet-g - i=get the the print settings right and it's incredibly strong - also relatively easy to print, compared to things like polycarbonate anyway.

    Also you might want to look at carbonfibre infused nylon.
    Stupidky tough, both nylon and carbon should give great low friction sliding.
    The donwside is that nyl,on can be a right bastard to print.

    taulman nylon 230 is probably the easiest to print I've ever tried.
    No it's not cheap - but you don't get miracles for peanuts.
    And it does come in 3mm - not everything does :-)
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Taulman-Nyl.../dp/B078MPR375

    But it does fill both criteria in one material.
    I found much a cheaper link? https://www.amazon.com/ThreeD-Printe...ustrial&sr=1-3

    I'm not sure why 3mm is good haha ;D. Do you have a recommendation for some cheap filament which simply prints well? There is far too many options out there for a noobie, Thanks.

  5. #5
    Student
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    32
    Unfortunately as aardvark says not all nylons (or any other material ) filaments are the same. Earlier this year when we decided to set up a small 3d printing facility for our Science Consultancy we tried a wide range of Nylon Filaments some as cheap as £15 per Kilo up to some £64 per kilo. Of those we tested with our simple machine we could only get good prints with 3 off those we tried Taulman Nylon 230 Taulman Bridge and Spectrum Filaments PA6 Low Warp. The £15 filament !! when we could get to stick on the base plate split between layers under its own internal stresses before it completed a print. The 3 filaments above print reliably every time.you get what you pay for!!

  6. #6

    Smile

    Interesting! Ideally I would have my own printer and be able to test different materials. One day I will own my own printer and have my way with testing different filaments. Online advice and many print attempts should hold me down for now. Thanks again for the help!

  7. #7
    Student
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    32
    Experiment is the only sure way to find what works for you, but advice sometimes helps ( and sometimes leads you astray) bu If you decide to use any of the filaments you mention I can let you have the details about how we print it as a starting point.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Gambo View Post
    Experiment is the only sure way to find what works for you
    I purchased OVERTURE PLA Filament 1.75mm just for now to get some prints started! I will potentially buy the
    taulman nylon 230 is probably the easiest to print
    That aardvark mentioned if my parts break! Will see how it goes for now. My school handles printer settings which is nice, I just need to find filament that is compatible for them.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    7,957
    well depending on speed and print plate material. I find that for 90% of pla prints 200c and 65c build plate work across the board - on all my machines and pretty much all the build surfaces I've used over the years..

    But as I've been playing with some pet-g today - got to say I am confused lol

    Prints great at near enough pla speeds - which apparently it should not. Very clean prints, no webbing or spiking - again, apparently not what it usually does.
    I'm currently down to 50c for the build plate to try and offset too much 'stick'.
    And I've been orinting with the cooling fan on 100% from layer 2 onwards.

    Pretty much all things the entire internet will tell you will not work with pet-g.

    So yeah - there is no substitute for individual experimentation.

    I will say that pla is a lot stronger than this pet-g, also a LOT harder.
    What the pet-g does have is 'toughness'. Much the same as nylon.
    ie: uit has abit more 'give'. So would be better for things like pond fittings or anything that needed a little bit of flex.
    Currently I make all our custom pond fittings from stiffish flexible pla.
    But next time we need so,ething I think I'll give pet-g a go.

    But yeah - been an interesting days experimentation.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •