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  1. #21
    Well, if you need to get more of those drivers, make sure to check out some of the big electronics distributors.

    https://www.digikey.com/product-deta...159-ND/5724190

    cause digikey has them for $8

  2. #22
    SO i now have parts on the way. powersupply, 300x300 heatbed, leadscrews, stepper motors, pulleys, belts, lots of goodies coming. still need to get the guide rails and bearings, extruder and design a frame. Id like to use 3mm so I need to get a geared extruder set up. I already have many rolls of 3mm, and the geared heads can work with both 3mm and 1.75, while direct drives can only do the 1.75 so id like to keep my options open.

  3. #23
    got my power supply, 300x300 hot plate, relay for the hotplate, z axis rods with bearings, Trinamic TRAMS board, sensor probe, few fans. more parts on the way. forgot to order some larger 24v fans for main cooling so inned to make sure i get a few of them.

    think this might be a bit overkill? XD
    http://www.mpja.com/24VDC-12-28VDC-6...info/33261+FN/

  4. #24
    Engineer-in-Training
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    Do you think 280cfm and 55db noise level is overkill for cooling the stepper drivers and ssr on a 3d printer? The power supply should already have its own fan and noise source, right? So how loud do you want your printer to be? My GEEETech i3 stays cool with a 40mm 12v fan. I mean it is not exactly a robust gaming graphics card with a gpu that has a higher thermal density than a nuclear reactor. No. This is like a cheap arm based Nintendo handheld. and the stick on aluminum heatsinks are almost if not optional.

    For fans you should be searching the lowest possible db or noise level, the right voltage, and what fits in the area you need it to and what has a large enough surface area to move air where you need it to move. But you don't need to create a wind tunnel in your control box or a tornado on your control board. Hell you might blow those stick on heatsinks off the stepper drivers.
    Last edited by AutoWiz; 05-14-2017 at 02:58 PM.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by AutoWiz View Post
    Do you think 280cfm and 55db noise level is overkill for cooling the stepper drivers and ssr on a 3d printer? The power supply should already have its own fan and noise source, right? So how loud do you want your printer to be? My GEEETech i3 stays cool with a 40mm 12v fan. I mean it is not exactly a robust gaming graphics card with a gpu that has a higher thermal density than a nuclear reactor. No. This is like a cheap arm based Nintendo handheld. and the stick on aluminum heatsinks are almost if not optional.

    For fans you should be searching the lowest possible db or noise level, the right voltage, and what fits in the area you need it to and what has a large enough surface area to move air where you need it to move. But you don't need to create a wind tunnel in your control box or a tornado on your control board. Hell you might blow those stick on heatsinks off the stepper drivers.
    it was a joke XD

  6. #26
    A microcontroller evaluation board has just the bare minimum components(one or two LEDs/Switches) on board to get started with development.LCD,Potentiometer,Keypad,etc., needs to separately bought and connected to evaluation board using jumper wires and breadboards - see the digi-key evaluation boards. Relatively new to the LED market, chip on board (COB) LEDs offer many advantages over the standard options. COB LEDs are basically multiple LED chips (typically nine or more) bonded directly to a substrate by the manufacturer to form a single module

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