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  1. #1

    Could Terrorists and Hackers Harm Us Through Our 3D Printers?

    A recent report/guide issued by the Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology, has gone over several ways in which hackers, or terrorists could harm defense manufacturers for the US Military, both physically, and from a production standpoint. Through attacks on systems, as well as hacking into hard drives and networks it is possible for terrorists to harm us from afar. More details on what can be done to prevent this, and what actually our fears should be can be found here: http://3dprint.com/14970/3d-print-hack-terrorism/

    Should this be a fear of the US Government and other governments as 3d printing begins to take over manufacturing floors?

  2. #2
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    What reason would you ever have to put your printer online to get hacked in the first place? I mean, I see a lot of gimmicks for internet-connected printers, but none of them have ever hit me as reasons.

    Unwary factories and labs can get slowed by attacks, absolutely, but corporate and international sabotage is nothing new. The Iranian lab attack may have been more important in making it known that the labs existed at all, since Iran had been hiding them up to that point. It should probably be emphasized though that these kind of attacks aren't generally the concern of the average person (certainly not more than the hacking of major credit card systems and the huge hacking attack on the Healthcare.gov site or the NSA surveillance of effectively everyone everywhere).

    The idea that hackers interested in individual citizens could cause intentional printer meltdowns hits me as the same media fearmongering that said hackers would be able to turn your hard drives and monitors into bombs in your house back in the '90s.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    What feign said.

    I'm struggling to find anything else to say because the question is so ludicrous.

  4. #4
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    Un less your printer can print a bomb in 10 seconds you have nothing to worry about, im moré concern about my creditcard been cloned on any restaurant than this kind of bullshit, lets be honest most mainstream media and almost any government want people be afraid of things these sectores cant control, so in my opinión that paper from the department of comerce is bullshit. Have a nice day

  5. #5
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    I can see the problem of distributed manufacturing and speed to re-production after a bust being a real problem for the authorities, 3d printing and cheap CNC generally allows that more than any other technology I think.

  6. #6
    This kind of thing could never affect household 3d printers. It was meant to say that large 3d printers with lasers and scary flammable powders in 3d factories could *potentially* explode.

  7. #7
    Scenario 1. Imagine an industrial 3D printer used to manufacture something to be used in a building structure. Eg. a pillar.

    This pillar should conform to certain features, eg. it should be so and so dense and be able to withstand this amount of weight, etc.

    Now, a hacker changes the model, the 3D printer creates a pillar that looks ok from the outside, but that is actually hollow. Or perhaps the materials mixture isn't as it should be. Or it has some other type of defect that would make it unfit to pass the safety checks. If the safety checks are indeed inaccurate and/or avoided and/or tampered with, that pillar could one day collapse. And part of the building with it.

    Scenario 2. Doctors use a 3D printer to manufacture a prosthetic implant, part of a bone, a vital medical implant, you-name-it. Hackers, again, insert some kind of malware that changes all models by decreasing the density of each manufactured object from, say, 1 to 0.8. The doctors don't notice the change because the (malware-tampered) software says everything's okay. A million medical implants get produced, shipped to hospitals and implanted. A few years later the first ones start to break down...

    You know, cyber-terrorism connected to 3D printing doesn't necessarily mean exploding printers.

    L.

    P.S.
    Feign, in order to be hacked a printer doesn't need to be online. Stuxnet was introduced into the Iranian computers with a USB key.
    Last edited by LucaS; 09-15-2014 at 11:27 AM.

  8. #8
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    While both of those are possibilities, they are unlikely for other reasons. The first because for both the mad hacker and the terrorist, introducing a flaw that will fail someday isn't terribly productive. No thrill in it for the hacker, and no sense of immediacy or attack in it for the terrorist. In the case of the medical implant, there's no competent medical device manufacturer that would just go without continuous testing their product because they trust their printing process. Like the pillar, no sense of immediacy for the perpetrator as well.

    Also, if someone is getting into your facility with hard copies of malware to put on your machines, you have a bigger problem than the malware itself. The Stuxnet attack on Iran's nuclear lab was carried out by a professional and highly competent national spy agency (no points for guessing which one, we don't need politics in here).

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Geoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian_Krassenstein View Post
    A recent report/guide issued by the Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology, has gone over several ways in which hackers, or terrorists could harm defense manufacturers for the US Military, both physically, and from a production standpoint. Through attacks on systems, as well as hacking into hard drives and networks it is possible for terrorists to harm us from afar. More details on what can be done to prevent this, and what actually our fears should be can be found here: http://3dprint.com/14970/3d-print-hack-terrorism/

    Should this be a fear of the US Government and other governments as 3d printing begins to take over manufacturing floors?
    ...........
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
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    NO!

    AND

    I'M PISSED at this idea for several reasons, like many other 'logical conclusions' our mind races to the end bypassing all the steps in between and we end up frozen in fear of what could 'theoretically' happen but in reality, wouldn't happen.



    1st of all, you need a printer capable of printing 'danger' and that requires the sophistication of the machine to actually print things like bombs.... and well you'd need a machine to actually have access to materials that would make bombs, for example.
    WE DON'T HAVE THIS...yet, and YET i mean like in a very fuking long time.

    2nd, you'd need this level of printer to be connected to the internet or some remote control. Don't incorporate wireless information transfer to your 3D printers. Make it a stand alone printer, and the ONLY WAY to interact with this printer is an OFFLINE computer.

    3rd, if your printer is connected, the hacker will have to bypass all the security protocols, and lets say they do. the hacker will have to know the way the machine is operated in the facility, like where the materials comes from, automate or not, if there are workers standing next to the printer ... turn the off button
    ...
    i mean something as simple as cutting power to the printer will prevent any and all hackers >.>

    4 When you're d one with the machine, unplug it... i don't care how good of a hacker you are, a powerless printer is a useless printer.

    to do all these security bypass and not lit up any red flags? and you'd wouldn't wanna hack some joe shmo's printer who can't print anything useful, if you wanna hack government level machines, try getting pass their fire walls first, then try getting past their internal infrastructure, then try getting past the people that work there, then try getting past that power supply....

    good luck >.> this is a waste of time discussing this topic.

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