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  1. #1

    Slicer question - Spiral/Vase mode with infill

    I have a large 3d printer that prints up to 1 meter cubed. I do most my printing with a 1mm nozzle and haven't had much luck finding reliable retractions settings that yield a good quality print. To keep the speed and quality up I print mostly in vase/spiral mode and a draw in little slits on the inner profile of the part using solidworks to simulate infill and increase strength, please see the image for clarification. Drawing in these slits is very tedious and I can't set overlap between the infill and wall because the printer thinks its all wall. Is there a slicer that produces infill like this that will work in vase/spiral mode?
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  2. #2
    Staff Engineer
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    I can't say with certainty that this is a suitable answer, especially as I scrubbed through the video to determine a rough approximation of value. Tom Stanton's second channel has an entry in which he creates an airfoil/wing for a project. His objective was to completely eliminate the geometry which requires retraction, as the foam-type filament he uses tends to bubble during retractions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJjhMan6T_E If you don't use Fusion 360, this video may not be as useful as it could be, but perhaps the approach will be. His statement in the video that it took him three weeks to develop this method says quite a lot. His engineering skills are amazing.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by fred_dot_u View Post
    I can't say with certainty that this is a suitable answer, especially as I scrubbed through the video to determine a rough approximation of value. Tom Stanton's second channel has an entry in which he creates an airfoil/wing for a project. His objective was to completely eliminate the geometry which requires retraction, as the foam-type filament he uses tends to bubble during retractions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJjhMan6T_E If you don't use Fusion 360, this video may not be as useful as it could be, but perhaps the approach will be. His statement in the video that it took him three weeks to develop this method says quite a lot. His engineering skills are amazing.
    Very cool part, thanks for sharing, unfortunately that's the same method I'm currently using. Its very tedious and gets really ugly if your original profile changes or is curved. I use solid works but the principles are the same. The guy did have some neat tricks that'll improve what I have been doing.

  4. #4
    Staff Engineer
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    Jun 2014
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    The concept is wonderful, generally speaking, but the execution is far too demanding, as you've discovered. It might take an incredible programmer to build a post-processor to take either an STL or g-code and create the desired ribs. Probably STL, as g-code is mostly last step for just about everything.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by fred_dot_u View Post
    The concept is wonderful, generally speaking, but the execution is far too demanding, as you've discovered. It might take an incredible programmer to build a post-processor to take either an STL or g-code and create the desired ribs. Probably STL, as g-code is mostly last step for just about everything.
    Building on what the video showed I think I can speed up my modeling a bit and maybe make it time effective.

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