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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by AsianGuy View Post
    @airscapes
    I’m looking specifically at the Taulman 910 high temp one. I’m looking to print a number of parts for various other hobbies, but one part will be a bracket that’s going in the engine compartment of a car. Therefore I am aiming for the high temp version – it’s said that they have a 150C thermal resistance after annealing. There is the Taulman PA Cast Plate Nylon, with a supposed 185C thermal resistance after annealing, but since the filament is so new, I can’t get much confirmation or information about it.

    The Polyimide tape appears to show some promise, but cover a glass plate with a narrow roll would leave lines on a printed model’s surface?


    Something like this:

    https://www.makergear.com/collection...20387220586594

    seem better, but then it starts getting into the price issues since I’d have to cut it to size (235mmx235mm)

    Has anyone printed nylon on glass with just PVA? I know Taulman suggest that for their filament, but it doesn’t appear like anyone I encounter on forum or YouTube does that.
    Yes it leaves a line, but with water floating the tape in place it can be rather thin.. it is 3d printed.. whats another line.. it is nothing but lines ;-)
    Yes I have printed on just glass with glue but warping is always the issue.. an enclosure with heat also helps with the warping. This mount almost sounds like you should be using aluminum.. just have it made and save a lot of time, hassle and maybe money trying to use Nylon, which I am going to bet you will not be happy with the end result, especially if it is a one off part.. sometimes just because you can do something, does not mean you should. Rather than just diving into the deep end, buy a roll of standard 910 and print some parts on glass and see how things go.. you can always try new bed surfaces..

  2. #12
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    Yes the Garolite you give with the link to is ok but a dear grade talk to McMaster-Carr their CE grade will do.I just cut mine to size with a craft knife. I use 1mm thick but in us seem to have 1/32 inch which I think would be a bit thin so 1/16 inch I guess 1.6mm. Sand the surface enough to remove al trace of shine and then clamp it down to the glass bed all round. I've never had to machine the surface but level it carefully and sometimes a slip paper under any low spots cures that problem. As I said I only print 3 grades of nylon and have never used any adhesion promotion with them just the sanded and cleaned Garolite. The only time I use PVA glue stick withNylon on Garolite is when there is a large surface of the print on the build plate when I use glue stick to REDUCE the adhesion so I can get the part off without damaging the Garolite surface/

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Gambo View Post
    Yes the Garolite you give with the link to is ok but a dear grade talk to McMaster-Carr their CE grade will do.I just cut mine to size with a craft knife. I use 1mm thick but in us seem to have 1/32 inch which I think would be a bit thin so 1/16 inch I guess 1.6mm. Sand the surface enough to remove al trace of shine and then clamp it down to the glass bed all round. I've never had to machine the surface but level it carefully and sometimes a slip paper under any low spots cures that problem. As I said I only print 3 grades of nylon and have never used any adhesion promotion with them just the sanded and cleaned Garolite. The only time I use PVA glue stick withNylon on Garolite is when there is a large surface of the print on the build plate when I use glue stick to REDUCE the adhesion so I can get the part off without damaging the Garolite surface/
    What grit sand paper, maybe mine is too smooth?

  4. #14
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    65c is too high to dry filament.
    For dehydrating purposes you want to be down around 40c.
    It's the airflow more than the heat that does the dehydrating.

    With a roll of filament you need to bear in mind that it's just the outer layers of filament that are exposed to moisture in th atmosphere.
    The inner filament stays dry.
    If you 'dry' it at 65-70c all you are doing is raising the core temp to the point where it will begin to soften. As its wrapped really tight, you are quite likely to deform the filament which will cause more problems with your printing than the actual moisture.

    Don't use the really cheap flying saucer dehydrators you get in the states (alas we only get the decent ones over here) go for an excalibur type - one with a thermostat and temperature control.

    drying is NOT cooking.
    To be honest a sealed bag with some silicon dehumidifier sachets is a better option anyway and use the dehydrator to re-condition the sachets.


    As far as damaging the print surface. I use printbite on my delta - a form of PEI.
    worst stick i had was with mymat (italian company) nylon.
    I ended up using a metal chisel and hammer to remove the test print.
    The printbite was completely unscathed. I've been using the same sheet for about 4 years now and it's as good as the day i got it.
    It's expensive stuff - but worth every penny.

    On my sapphire pro I went the other way, and bought the cheapest self adhesive sheet of PEI I could find.
    Works really well - not quite as good at releasing as the printbite - but as long as you get your print settings right I have had no problems removing things.

    But where chemistry goes - listen to gambo, he genuinely knows what he's talking about ;-)
    Last edited by curious aardvark; 06-24-2021 at 10:35 AM.

  5. #15
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    240 Grit foam back 3ms

  6. #16
    Thank you all again for the feedback!

    @airscapesI can see how based on what I shared, I’m over engineering a solution to a minor problem. I glossed over dozens of parts I want to print, because the printer right now seems more than capable of it. However the one part that requires special consideration is the piece that I plan to put in the engine compartment of a car. Others have done this, but in PLA, and they had complained about it sagging, I wanted to get ahead of the problem and use something that was temperature resistant. Unfortunately this part isn’t purchasable in aluminum because it is very much a do it yourself project.

    @gamboThank you for confirming the product from McMaster. I think based on what was shared, I’ll try PVA on glass first and then the garolite variant you mentioned from McMaster to compare the results. As @airspaces had inquired, what level of “scuff” did you get it to? Finally, what is your PVA formulation? Do you use magigoo or did you just mix 50/50 water and elmer’s all glue?

    @curisou aardvarkThank you for the heads up, I hadn’t thought about filament deformation, I wouldof clearly baked the filament. Most sources I saw said to use around 55C to 60C. I’m not entirely sure what you meant by Excalibur type? I’m thinking that’s a jargon I’m not familiar with. I specifically got this because of the temperature control:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    From my research, dehydrating would reduce the water content of a filament, whereas using desiccant only maintains it? I read some folks dislike the desiccant route because if you buy them in bulk, they are often loose and the powder can get on the filament and muck up the nozzle


    I plan to heat my enclosure, would having that at 40C be ideal?

  7. #17
    Engineer-in-Training
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    Hi
    Scuff Levwl. I sand the surface of the Tufnol/Garolite with a 240 grit abrasive pad until the surface is matt all over with no trace of shine, this only takes a couple of mins.

    The PVA I use only to REDUCE Nylon's grip on the tufnol is glue stick like elmer's school glue I apply it while the print bed is warm.

    Pleas note that I have only had success with a small number of brands of filament 3 out of 6 or 7 I tried!! unfortunately they were all premium brands!!

  8. #18
    One last thought on the car part.. Why not print it in PETG first and test it out while you are working on the upgrades to your printer. You may find that PETG printed at 98% infill does the job and if not you have verified you part and nylon will print with the same settings as PETG just need to adjust the temps..

  9. #19
    @Gambo


    Thank you for the information, I feel much more equip to tackle Nylon if the glass bed doesn’t work!
    Is Taulman3D a premium brand? I’m so new I don’t know what is considered premium or overpriced. What’s your view about Makerbot nylon? I was also considering that


    @airscapes


    I don’t know too much about PETG, does it have any off gas?
    In your opinion, what are the pro and cons of PETG vs. Nylon?

  10. #20
    Do a goggle search for 3d filament comparison and read about each type and it's pros and cons and spec.
    These are just 2 of many article
    https://all3dp.com/1/3d-printer-fila...g-3d-filament/
    https://rigid.ink/pages/filament-comparison-guide

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