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  1. #1

    Looking for a new 3d printer

    Hoping some of you can recommend a 3d printer that can support a 15" tall, 12" wide, 10" thick build. I would like it be fast. I have no preference of consumables.

    Any help with this selection would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    what is your budget ?

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by curious aardvark View Post
    what is your budget ?
    I would say 2k max

  4. #4
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    Nice - some interesting machines in there.

    Build volume rules out resin machines - anything nthat big will cost considerably more.

    So we're immediately down to fdm.

    What sort of things are you thinking about printing ?
    Presumably as you have a size you've got something specific in mind ?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by curious aardvark View Post
    Nice - some interesting machines in there.

    Build volume rules out resin machines - anything nthat big will cost considerably more.

    So we're immediately down to fdm.

    What sort of things are you thinking about printing ?
    Presumably as you have a size you've got something specific in mind ?
    Looking to print special mannequin heads for a project.
    What printers that use fdm are the fastest?

  6. #6
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    the corexy design is easily the fastest of current fdm designs. And there are some big print volumes and decent machines around.

    Speed is partly determined by the printer's mechanocs and partly by the actual print settings.

    For example the same model that takes1 hour at 0.3mm layer height will take 3 hours at 0.1mm layer height.
    The more shells you use the longer it takes and the more plastic you use.
    The higher the infill - the longer it takes.

    You can also use different diameter nozzles.
    A 0.5mm nozzle is capable of almost the same level of detail as a 0.4mm nozzle.
    But will print at 0.4mm layer height and will give you a thicker shell for fewer layers.
    So something as simple as switching from 0.4mm to 0.5mm can ncrease printing speed by as much as 30% with little loss of quality.

    Larger nozzles don't necessarily keep speeding things up.
    The larger the bead the faster you need to cool it to avoid it deforming before it sets. So - machine dependant you actually print slower with larger nozzles.

    The whole thing is a balance between how fast you can lay down a bead of molten plastic and how fast you can cool it.

    what country are you in ? - so i know which amazon shop to look in :-)

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by curious aardvark View Post
    the corexy design is easily the fastest of current fdm designs. And there are some big print volumes and decent machines around.

    Speed is partly determined by the printer's mechanocs and partly by the actual print settings.

    For example the same model that takes1 hour at 0.3mm layer height will take 3 hours at 0.1mm layer height.
    The more shells you use the longer it takes and the more plastic you use.
    The higher the infill - the longer it takes.

    You can also use different diameter nozzles.
    A 0.5mm nozzle is capable of almost the same level of detail as a 0.4mm nozzle.
    But will print at 0.4mm layer height and will give you a thicker shell for fewer layers.
    So something as simple as switching from 0.4mm to 0.5mm can ncrease printing speed by as much as 30% with little loss of quality.

    Larger nozzles don't necessarily keep speeding things up.
    The larger the bead the faster you need to cool it to avoid it deforming before it sets. So - machine dependant you actually print slower with larger nozzles.

    The whole thing is a balance between how fast you can lay down a bead of molten plastic and how fast you can cool it.

    what country are you in ? - so i know which amazon shop to look in :-)
    Thanks for that info!
    I am in California, USA

  8. #8
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    From all that I have read it sounds to me like you need a custom built 3d printer. Something hand made by someone of high skills to perform a specific task for you. The things that make a printer run fast do not come on store bought rigs. Marlin, Rep Rap Firmware(RRF), and all the custom firmwares out there are all second best to Klipper in the name of fast printing which requires a raspberry pi to run. The only way you will end up with that on your own is to buy a printer and start modding it. But also print speed at the end of the day is ultimately determined by how fast we can extrude and lay down that filament. So as we chase the high speed printing we need specialized extruders that won't skip on the filament or deform it before it feeds it into the hotend. And the hotend itself needs to have a larger melt zone in it to allow for the faster moving filament to have a chance to melt on its way to the nozzle. And then the controller. Can you believe a lot of the printers sold today are still running 8 bit control boards?! You will never print at a good speed with a machine that has an 8 bit brain that can think as fast and as much as 16mhz. That's like trying to get a brain damaged retard to stop drooling on himself and do your math test for you. Ya know? And 32 bit mainboards are all so very different from one another in terms of processing power. And that really matters as we chase actual print speed because the faster we hope to print directly translates into the faster the brain has to make more decisions. And then there is inertia. All of these printers are weak sauce and their frames so much less rigid that you would believe. And you will learn that as you try to ramp up speed on ANY printer. Because it is hard to stop a train and once we sling a carriage one direction at a certain speed inertia keeps that carriage moving a touch past the point where the stepper motor stops or goes the other direction. This inertia caused distortion in our print quality that is also identified as 'ringing' can be mitigated by correctly and thoughtfully bracing the frame and it's axes. By someone who actually knows how to do this I mean. It is for all these reasons that anybody in this hobby could only agree with that I suggest and extend my offer to you to build you a 3d printer custom tailored to your needs. I just need you to send me a whole lot of money and tell me more about what you would require out of your ideal 3d printer and we can get started ordering some parts and designing others.
    Last edited by AutoWiz; 02-21-2021 at 12:39 PM.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    Oh - now that's an interesting offer.

    And, personally, having seen his work over the last few years - I'd take autowiz up on his offer.

    With one caveat (lol)
    He's a pretty liberal spender with his own money.
    Lord knows what he's like with other peoples.

    So just because he tells you that platimum coated linear rails with custom ground diamond bearings are the only way to go. Stick to your guns and just use conventional steel instead ;-)

    But otherwise. hell yeah :-)

    I'd still go corexy, as out of the four main fdm printer types - and I do own examples of all four: cartesian, delta, I3 and corexy. - corexy is hands down the best.

    But unless you're in a hurry - it's a great idea !

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by curious aardvark View Post
    Oh - now that's an interesting offer. And, personally, having seen his work over the last few years - I'd take autowiz up on his offer. With one caveat (lol)He's a pretty liberal spender with his own money. Lord knows what he's like with other peoples. So just because he tells you that platimum coated linear rails with custom ground diamond bearings are the only way to go. Stick to your guns and just use conventional steel instead ;-) But otherwise. hell yeah :-)I'd still go corexy, as out of the four main fdm printer types - and I do own examples of all four: cartesian, delta, I3 and corexy. - corexy is hands down the best. But unless you're in a hurry - it's a great idea !
    AutoWiz sounds like a wild card when it comes to how much it will cost.Which one you likehttps://www.amazon.com/s?k=corexy&ref=nb_sb_noss_1

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