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  1. #1

    Recommendation for Printer/Material/Technology to print small cookie cutter

    Hi Everyone,


    I am trying to find the best printer/technology/material for small cookie cutters. It does not matter if the material is food safe as it will be used to cut clay and not actual cookies.
    To do some research I have ordered some custom made cutters as samples to examine them:





    Most of these custom cutters online is similar to Cutter A on the left side of the picture. That one has about 0.8 mm blade part and some edge around it which is not really good for thicker clay as it will leave some parts on the final cut which is hard to remove.
    On the other hand there is Cutter B which is made by a company called FMM Sugarcraft, and here is the product: https://www.fmmsugarcraft.com/produc...ric-cutter-set


    What are your thoughts on Cutter B? What would be your advise to achieve a similar result? Like printer/technology and material? I believe it does not necessarily has to be 0.2 mm thin if it would be possible to create a similar wall thickness as Cutter A with some average 3D printer but without that edge, maybe using some different filament type to make it more strong? I believe that is the reason why everyone is printing these type of cutters with that edge, to add more strength to the blade.


    I know that SLA/DLP printers have better accuracy I am not sure however if those resins would make a good cutter, At the moment I am looking after the most commonly available FDM printers so if it would be possible to do this with FDM printers that would be amazing, but please let me know if you have any other thoughts.


    This may help:
    My Location: Ireland / EU
    Budget: 1000 EUR / 1200 USD
    Experience with 3D printing: zero, just started reading articles, tests, etc, but I have 3D modeling experience.
    Build volume: > 150 x 150 mm
    What I want to do with the printer: 50% mainly printing those cutters for clay, and 50% printing other useful functional stuffs around the home
    Note: As I am in an apartment, the printer should be enclosed. I don't really want to build it myself also


    Thank you,
    TZ
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    Almost any filament 3d printer will cover your requirements except the enclosure which is un-necessary for some materials like PLA. I bought a Ender 3 pro a year ago for professional use and though Creality get a lot of bad press I have used it to make plastic parts for 3 current projects for our small design team. We have logged more than 1100hrs of use so not bad for a machine costing less than 200 EURO !!! It is a very basic machine but on that basis less to go wrong -KISS = Keep it simple because I'm Stupid.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Gambo View Post
    Almost any filament 3d printer will cover your requirements except the enclosure which is un-necessary for some materials like PLA. I bought a Ender 3 pro a year ago for professional use and though Creality get a lot of bad press I have used it to make plastic parts for 3 current projects for our small design team. We have logged more than 1100hrs of use so not bad for a machine costing less than 200 EURO !!! It is a very basic machine but on that basis less to go wrong -KISS = Keep it simple because I'm Stupid.
    Thanks for your comment!
    Which one would be achievable with Ender 3 pro? Cutter A with longer blade part or Cutter B?
    I still want some enclosure as if I buy something I would like to experiment/play with other materials too.

  4. #4
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    Either would be easy to make with an ender 3 but a little tweeking would help for instance 1 mm walls would help with a taper not a step. Creality do make an enclosure for the Ender 3 but it is a sort of mini Pop up tent.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    yeah - basically any fdm printer can do either type.

    Without changing the nozzle - the standard fdm bead width is 0.4mm.

    So if you assume that the minimum edge width is around 0.5mm, you won't go far wrong.

    You can use a smaller diameter nozzle for a finer edge, 0.25mm is about the most sensible small size to go down to.

    But bear in mind an edge that thin would be quite fragile. I don' think you'd need to go finer than 0.5 mm.
    Though I suppose that would depend on how intricate the designs you wanted to make into cutters are.

    Personally I wouldn't touch an ender 3 with a barge pole taped to another barge pole held by a man with really long arms. But that's the result of spoending over three years trying to sort out the many hundreds of people who come to this forum with ender 3 issues.

    So for an actual recommended machine - what is your maximum budget ?
    And what's the largest cutter you are likely to want to make ?

    And as gambo says - creating a cutting edge that tapers is pretty simple.
    Last edited by curious aardvark; 02-17-2021 at 01:42 PM.

  6. #6
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    To make my view clear about the Ender 3 pro I bought 1 a year ago at the beginning of lock down incase there were issues with getting 3d printed parts made by the SLS bureau we were spending up to £100 per week with for prototype parts. In buying the Ender we knew it was a very basic machine and that was it attraction ie KISS (keep it simple stupid). The Ender was built down to a price and in at least 2 aspects has gone to far, In fact we have had no trouble with it until very recently when I jambed it and broke a belt after hundreds of small parts had been made on the machine. So many Chinese manufactures seems to suffer from quality control issues that in our design you often hear somebody exclaim "O Chinese quality again" and Creality from what I read on this forum is no different!

    "So You pays yer money and yer takes your pick"

  7. #7
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    There are millions - possibly - hundreds of thousands certainly, of the ender 3 design around.
    Some work and if it's your only 3d printer and it works - you think it's a miracle machine and get annoyed - all the way up to offensively abusive - when someone like me (okay there is nobody else like me) so just me. Says it's a piece of crap that is badly designed and that an awful lot of people have problems with it.
    Both of those are true facts (as opposed to the other kind).
    I am taking the wider view.
    I am also recommending very complex machines to people who I want to enjoy using them and have as little trouble as possible.

    So when one manufacturer designs a range of machines that have generated more: 'my printer isn't working properly' threads than ALL the other manufacturrs and machines ever mentiond or featured on this forum COMBINED.
    There is no way I can recommend those machines to anyone.

    Gambo has had a positive experience, as have many other people. But taking the long view, there is still an awfully large percentage of creality and ender owners having a lot of problems.

    ON that basis alone, I can not recommend anyone buy one, ever.

  8. #8
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    Hi CA I understand your point of view !

  9. #9
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    here is an example this was made of PET-G and is 75mm overall and 12mm high wall thickness 2mm at base tapering to 0.8mm at cutting edge used 5.5grm and about 30min build time.
    IMG_20210218_140111.jpg

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by curious aardvark View Post
    yeah - basically any fdm printer can do either type. Without changing the nozzle - the standard fdm bead width is 0.4mm. So if you assume that the minimum edge width is around 0.5mm, you won't go far wrong. You can use a smaller diameter nozzle for a finer edge, 0.25mm is about the most sensible small size to go down to.But bear in mind an edge that thin would be quite fragile. I don' think you'd need to go finer than 0.5 mm. Though I suppose that would depend on how intricate the designs you wanted to make into cutters are. Personally I wouldn't touch an ender 3 with a barge pole taped to another barge pole held by a man with really long arms. But that's the result of spoending over three years trying to sort out the many hundreds of people who come to this forum with ender 3 issues.So for an actual recommended machine - what is your maximum budget ? And what's the largest cutter you are likely to want to make ?And as gambo says - creating a cutting edge that tapers is pretty simple.

    Many thanks for your comment. I have checked couple of machines and as I want something enclosed due to the fact it will be in a living room (and have the possibility to experiment with other material types) and these are starting from 400-500 EUR, my budget is somewhere between 500-1000 EUR. I was looking at these machine as a first look: Monoprice MP Voxel, Da Vinci Jr WiFi Pro, Da Vinci 1.0 Pro, Up mini 2 (ES?) (this looks awesome but the build volume is a bit small 120 x 120 mm but would be OK for cutters and limited for larger experiments), Flashforge Creator Pro (2?), Up Box+ (and this is a bit out of budget). The maximum cutter size I would print is very small, about 4 x 4 cm so even the UP mini 2 would be OK for that.

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