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  1. #1
    Engineer-in-Training
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    Make 3D printer run faster?

    I have SainSmart Coreception 3D printer that runs at 3600mm/min. It has CoreXY belt system and box-like frame. Is it possible to make it run faster?

  2. #2
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    Well you could upgrade from the generic titan direct drive extruder to a dual drive Bondtech extruder and mount it on the frame with a high quality Capricorn tube so you will have even less weight being slung around on X and Y and are grabbing the filament from both sides. Then you could upgrade to a better mainboard chasing the highest operating frequency and I can save you some time there. The best is over $200 and made by Duet. Aside from that the SKR PRO is about the best you can do because it's processor runs at 168mhz. Then you could get some better drivers. The 2208's are nice. They made our printers quiet. the 2226's are better. They support more current. They run cooler. They have stallguard4 which helps prevent skipped steps. We should care about that when we are chasing high printing speeds and pushing our machines to areas where they are prone to skip steps. Also there is the volcano hotend or equivelant for whatever you are running. But a larger melt zone in the hotend will allow for higher print speeds. applying a mains powered silicone heater to the bottom of the heated bed and converting it from 12/24v power to 110/120v can shave whole minutes off of the print time. For example, the TronXY 500 bed is so large at 500x500 with a 24v heater it can take up to 10 minutes just for the bed to heat up before a print starts. This is an extreme case as that is among if not the largest print bed out there right now. But the mains powered silicone heater will heat that bed to 110c in under a minute. So if your bed heats up slow and this takes minutes for your print to start. And your printer otherwise moves pretty quick, then this might be a good change to make your printer print faster. And then there is always running the latest version of Marlin. 2.0.7.3 is the latest as I understand it. Then when you have all the right hardware as best you can get it, and your frame is as rigid as you can get it, then you can head on over to Youtube and start searching for tutorials on tuning for speed and quality. You will find that some find out how fast they can extrude filament and then base all movements off of this speed. And some just tune for no artifacts in the surface of the print which usually takes you in a different direction away from speed. And it is up to you to find whatever happy ground you are looking for. Here is one of these tuning tutorial videos: Remove ringing by tuning acceleration and junction deviation - step by step guide - YouTube . Or you could start with the tuning and identify problems and then change parts as you push them out of their operating speeds. Like upgrade the extruder to dual drive after you find that the single drive keeps digging into the filament from retractions at such high speeds. And change the mainboard only after you have bounced off the limitation of the 8 bit world. This process will save you more money but take longer to achieve real results. Tuning a stock printer for speed will always land you small results as the printer should come pretty well calibrated to it's own hardware. I prefer to make a bunch of changes first to warrant the tuning sessions but that doesn't have to be the way.
    Last edited by AutoWiz; 11-27-2020 at 06:36 AM.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    if it's a corexy and you're running it at 60mm/s - then hell yeah you can make it go faster.

    For fine derail stuff it should be good for 76-100 mm/s and for rough-ish 'useful' prints 150-200mm/s.

    The key thing is to make sure the belts are as tight as you can get them.
    With each belt being so long and going through such a convoluted path - it can be tricky to get them tight. If you look on thingiverse there should be mods to help tighten the belts.

    Also if it's not already direct drive - change it to direct drive.
    Should be a fairly simple job - usually just a printable bracket that allows you to bolt the extruder assembly on top of the hot end.

    And maybe try a different slicer.

    But 60nn/s is seriously slow for a corexy.

    Is it still in the 'box'.

    And my brain is now telling me it's already direct drive - so that's good.

    Hotend is fine. pretty much bog any standard hotend is good for 150mm/s at 0.3mm layer height.
    Well mine are and they are certainly nothing special :-)

    You don't actually need to up the temp much either.

    for pla.
    For 150mm/s at 0.3 layer I usually run at 210c.
    for 150mm/s at 0.1 later - I'll run it at 200c.

    Different filaments are happeir at different speeds.
    so what filamet type are you porinti ng at 60mm/s

    And the reason I use mm/s rather than mm per minute is quite simple.
    I can envisage 60 mms travel in one second. I cannot envisage 3600mm in a minute.

    You can move your finger against a ruler for the count of 1. and clearly see how fast it is.
    You can't do that for mm per minute.

  4. #4
    Engineer-in-Training
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    I made some test prints and found out that 4800mm/min is fast enough.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    80mm/s ?

    that's barely cruising speed :-)

  6. #6
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    I tried 150mm/s and it worked! That's 9000mm/min!! I was worried about the printer shaking itself and the table apart. Watching the 3D view in Simplify3D while the printer is working made me think that the printer automatically adjust speeds so that the prints come out good.

  7. #7
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    OR it could make you think that print speed is just a max number. But the actual final print speed is run through a bunch of other filters first. You know things like acceleration, jerk or junction deviation, first layer, outer perimiters, etc, etc, etc. In fact 150mms print speed just means that on a long enough stretch like from one side of the print bed all the way to the other you might touch 150mm/s print speed. Because you have enough room to reach that speed with the given acceleration setting which you did NOT touch. Now, if you wanna have some fun while you are at 150mm/s start walking up the acceleration setting just until your quality begins to degrade. Then fine tune your junction deviation/jerk settings and get that LIN ADVANCE enabled and calibrated.

  8. #8
    OR it could make you think that print speed is just a max number. But the actual final print speed is run through a bunch of other filters first. You know things like acceleration, jerk or junction deviation, first layer, outer perimiters, etc, etc, etc. You need to see this advice In fact 150mms print speed just means that on a long enough stretch like from one side of the print bed all the way to the other you might touch 150mm/s print speed. Because you have enough room to reach that speed with the given acceleration setting which you did NOT touch. Now, if you wanna have some fun while you are at 150mm/s start walking up the acceleration setting just until your quality begins to degrade. Then fine tune your junction deviation/jerk settings and get that LIN ADVANCE enabled and calibrated.
    agreed
    during my first couple months I was calibrating the hell out of my machine
    now I know how the Garrus from ME felt
    Last edited by simonss22; 12-08-2020 at 05:35 PM.

  9. #9
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    Hey thanks. I have been searching and watching tuning and calibration videos on youtube for some time now. The general strategy seems to be to first understand how fast your extruder can extrude filament. heat it up, raise it up, and start extruding 100mm of filament at a time then faster then faster then faster. watching the filament that comes out. When it stops being the same thickness as it extrudes you will know you are past the extruders limits. This is your max feedrate and should be the first number we punch in to our calibrations. And in this way we are looking at max feedrate not as how fast can we print but the limiter to make sure we do not have printer motions outperform what the extruder can do. Then we can look at acceleration and others. But it all starts with understanding how fast your specific extruder can perform with the filament it is melting and extruding.

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