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Thread: PET - not pet-g

  1. #11
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    I've had no stringing issues with either pet-g or pet.

    Maybe because I don't keep the filament sealed, dunno.
    I've put the roll of PET outside under the balcony - where it's open to the elements without actually getting rained on.
    To test my: 'it works better after absorbing some moisture' theory.
    PET's basically water resistant - so it won't get soggy.
    But it was weird that the first 2-300gms were brilliant and then it did start stringing with the exact same settings.
    I figure by leaving it outside in a damp uk november, it should accelerate the results I got from 2 years in my workshop - which is not much warmer, but a lot dryer :-)

  2. #12
    PETG (as the end product) doesn't actually contain glycol, the G indicates that it's manufactured using a modified glycol mixture. All the glycol is used in the reaction that forms the polymer, there's no free glycol in the final polymer (or at least it's an insignificant amount present only as a contaminant).

    PET is a polymer produced by the esterification and condensation of terephthalic acid with ethylene glycol.

    PETG is a polymer produced by the esterification and condensation of terephthalic acid with a mixture of ethylene glycol and another glycol (unspecified but often (cyclohexane-1,4-diyl)dimethanol or trimethylethyl glycol).

    PET-T is a polymer produced by the esterification and condensation of terephthalic acid with a mixture of ethylene glycol and trimethylethyl glycol.

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