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  1. #1
    Technician
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    56

    filament filament all over where shouldnt be, how do I fix this

    I just finished a 27 hour print. And I have to say it was the "dirtiest" print I've ever had. There was filament pieces all over the bed. During the print, it looked like filament was "leaking" from above the nozzle. When the print was finished I set to find out what's going on. I traced the "leak" back to where tube from cooling fins that goes into heating block. I have the suspected leak area circled in one of the pictures. Other pics show "path" of filament leak. There was NO filament up inside cooling fin. At first thought was I can solder a bead around the tube and heating block until I realized its aluminum and wondered about solder melting temps. So I tossed that idea. So here I am, ANY IDEAS?
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  2. #2
    Engineer-in-Training
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    396
    Once you've cleaned all the leaked filament from the heater block, heat break, nozzle and heat sink, re-install the heater block on the heat break properly, along with the nozzle.

    The key factor in this is that the heat break should extend into the heater block far enough that the nozzle does not sit flush on the heater block, but have a gap of one millimeter or so. You have to heat the nozzle assembly before unscrewing things and adjusting it. It might be wise in your case to separate the heater block from the heat break and the nozzle from the heater block, to ensure you have to filament remaining inside to interfere with proper assembly.

    Use great care around the thermistor and heater cartridge wiring or you'll have more than one repair to address.

    Once clear (and cooled), thread the heater block onto the heat break. Thread the nozzle into position until it contacts the heat break. If it is not a millimeter from the heater block, back the nozzle off a bit and tighten the heat break farther into the block. With the heat break and nozzle properly adjusted, hold securely the heater block and tighten the nozzle. This will also tighten the heat break to the heater block.

    Bring the assembly up to temperature, about 250°C should do, although some recommendations state 300°C and re-tighten carefully.

    This will eliminate the leaking filament. If not, something else is seriously wrong.

    You should not be soldering anything other than wires on a 3D printer, unless you're using the soldering iron to smooth out plastic on a model.

  3. #3
    Technician
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    56
    Heat break? Is that the pipe/tube shown attaced to heat block? Is that removable? How attached, threads, pressure fit? So that tube/pipe should extend into heater block so as when nozzle is threaded on, it touches bottom of that pipe?

  4. #4
    Engineer-in-Training
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    396
    If you have internet access, you can find a number of diagrams showing how the assembly is constructed. From the top, you have the finned heat sink. Inside the bottom of the heat sink is a double threaded tube which should be as tight as practical inside the heat sink. This is the heat break. Some people recommend thermal transfer grease on those threads. The shorter threaded section goes into the heater block on one side, the nozzle goes into the other side. It's practical to thread the nozzle into the heater block but stop a millimeter from flush. Thread the heat sink and heat break assembly until the heat break contacts the nozzle, then tighten the nozzle, while holding firmly and carefully to the heater block.

    To explicitly answer your question, yes, the nozzle touches firmly the bottom of the heat break.

  5. #5
    Technician
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    56
    Just read your reply The "heat break" may be threaded going into heat block, but held inside the cooling fin with a set screw only, as seen in the picture with blue circle, there are no threads at that end. Ill look into other end to confirm threads on block end lol stand by for news THANK YOU

  6. #6
    Technician
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    56
    DONT know if Imentioned I have a Ender 3 Pro

  7. #7
    Technician
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    56
    I first tried to remove tube heat break? from heat block. At first it wouldn't budge. Then I heated it up to 195 and out it came. Tomorrow I'll clean the threads because on heat break threads, they look dirty black. I have a comprehensive set of tap and dies. Then I'll see just how far it can screw into the heat block

  8. #8
    Engineer-in-Training
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    396
    Don't use a die on the heat break. You could inject stress risers in a thermally dynamic environment consisting of slightly dissimilar metals. Clean it only as much as needed to thread it into the heater block and to contact the nozzle from the other direction.

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