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  1. #1

    Any tips for a full suit 3d print

    So i am getting my 3d printer in a couple of days (creality ender 3) and after a bit of learning would like to start a long project since i am getting bored of gaming. Currently i am planning on a full suit of some kind ( not to wear but to display next to my pc) The whole thing will be made out of pla since it will be printing right next to me and abs is supposed to have toxic fumes. It is quite a small print bed so it will be in multiple parts so any recommendations for attaching together and filling gaps, ive heard bondo is good at filling in gaps but its really expensive to import to the UK so are there any alternatives? Does anybody have any recommendations for a full suit to print (e.g Iron man, storm trooper etc).Are there any specific tools i should have?How much filament do you think i will need? And any other tips / recommendations?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    good luck with that on an ender 3 :-)

    Just out of curiosity, why did you go for that model ?

  3. #3
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    good luck with that on an ender 3 :-)

    Just out of curiosity, why did you go for an ender 3 ?
    Despite all the problems, cheap components and lousy design - people keep buying them and I'd like to know why :-)

    whatever 'bondo' is - there will be the same thing by a different name over here.

  4. #4
    Engineer-in-Training
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    Polyester body filler is a more generic term for the brand name product bondo.

    If you use an existing model of your suit and chop it up in small enough pieces to print on the bed, you will not have particularly large gaps if done properly. Meshmixer has a "plane cut" feature that performs nicely for this requirement. The segments are cut in such a way that there are zero gaps when assembled. CA glues, especially quality brand name versions will bond PLA quite well.

  5. #5
    Technologist
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    I think as you learn how 3d fabrication works you will realize what you can and can not do within reason. But first you must learn to; Sit up, crawl, stand, walk, then you can run..

  6. #6
    Engineer-in-Training
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    In our makerspace, a few of our members also participate in cosplay related builds. I would not consider the project which jasonjacob has undertaken to be particularly advanced. Both the practice of breaking a model into smaller pieces and also the concept of approaching such a task in small pieces is a good start.

    How does one eat an elephant? One piece at a time.

  7. #7
    Technologist
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    Sounds like a plan! Please keep us in the loop as you progress.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    as far as what suit to make.
    Iron man seems to be very popular. So should be parts and plans readily available. Plus you get to play with leds for the chest plate and palm thrusters.

    told you: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1779274

  9. #9
    Engineer-in-Training
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    Jun 2014
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    Wow, almost 200,000 downloads of that Ironman costume. Interesting note from the creator, "it's not comfortable!"

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