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  1. #1
    Engineer-in-Training
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    Oct 2013
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    Is it Worth $300 more for the 2nd Gen Solidoodle?

    If I were to buy a solidoodle, is it worth spending $799 on the second generation unit, or just buying the older one for $99? What are the main advantages to the newer version, anyone know? I am asking this more for a friend than for myself. Any help would be appreciated

  2. #2
    Technician Mcbride19's Avatar
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    You mean 2nd and third generation because they don't sell the first generation anymore .
    SD2(2nd generation) and SD3(3rd) are the same printers the only difference is the size, you can print bigger models with the SD3.
    I think(but it's only my opinion) it's better to buy the SD2 because it dosen't cost much and for the price you can print big enough models .
    As far as I know the 2nd generation is far better than the first.
    Last edited by Mcbride19; 11-02-2013 at 09:11 AM.

  3. #3
    Well, the 3rd gen comes with heatbed as standard whereas the 2nd gen does not come with this as standard although it is available in the pro version which is 599$
    I think its nice to have a big print area (especially x/y) when you want to print larger objects such as cupholders for the car and such.
    Once i actually had to print a part that was longer than the x/y axes, and we had to redesign an angle at the object while rotating it to 45° around the Z axis to have it inside the print area...
    so i would say go for 3rd gen or an entirely different printer, as it requires a lot of tuning to print properly

  4. #4
    Technician Mcbride19's Avatar
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    The heatbed comes also on the 2nd generation as an option, but the heatbed of the solidoodle's printers is not enough efficient to print real big models, with a thermal camera you can see that there is big temperature's variations all over the bed so when you print big models you can have problems to stick on the bed.
    If you really need to print big models so change the heatbed or try another printer.
    My opininion is: until you are not sure of what you're going to do with a printer and you don't need to print very big models you can save your money and choose the SD2, later you can buy a real bigger printer.
    The Solidoodles prints better after some tunning (2nd and 3rd generation), it's right, but you can print needed parts with it and it's really interresting for a beginner.
    That"s what I made, I began with a SD2, I learned how to make good prints with it for a few month after that I bought a Rostock Max to print better quality and bigger models, the money I saved by choosing the SD2 has been used to buy the rostock.
    I think that if you want to learn electric guitar you are not going to buy a Les Pauls that cost 3000 or 4000 $ but a 200 or 400 $ model, the day you know how to play you can buy a better one.
    It's only my opinion of course but i think it's a better way like that
    Last edited by Mcbride19; 11-03-2013 at 01:48 AM.

  5. #5
    I agree with Mcbride. I think it's best to start with the SD2, and later buy something bigger/better if you think you need it. The SD2 is a very handy printer that seems to get most jobs done.

  6. #6
    Mcbride, i know that the heatbed on doodles are not very efficient... that is if you dont mod it like i did. but you barely save any money by upgrading to the SD2 pro version compared to the SD3.
    Also that Les Pauls thing.. thats quite a comparison as the SD3 would not compare to anything that good :P
    @RedSox2013 if you decide to go buy a Solidoodle be sure to check out my SD upgrade thread, especially the one about sanding the kapton

  7. #7
    Technician Mcbride19's Avatar
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    I suppose that you are sanding the kapton to stick better the models on the bed and I know that it ,sometimes works but not for everyone.
    I prefer a different way that works well : using a 2mm glass on the bed and low cost hairspray or a coktail made with abs and aceton. The second one stick sor much that you must wait until the model is cold to take off the model from the bed.
    I going to traduct a beginner's help thread that I made for solidoodles's beginners and post it . I will give some useful tips and also some upgrades for the solidoodle's printer

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