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  1. #1

    Hobby printer in an apartment, ok or dangerous?

    Hello everyone. I just ordered Anycubic Photon without actually researching too much into resin.
    I read yesterday that resin is toxic and that the printer should not be kept in the same room you are in.
    I only have 3 rooms, bedroom, kitchen and the living room. I don't have a balcony and the printer will end up in the living room.
    The best thing I could do to vent is to open the window. I also live in a rather cold country and the winter is coming so I wouldn't want to keep the windows open for too long.
    My plan is to print miniatures for board games and maybe even sell some, so the amount of time I spend printing could increase.

  2. #2
    Engineer-in-Training Roberts_Clif's Avatar
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    Add Roberts_Clif on Thingiverse
    Do not know about this resin toxicity, I personally vent all 3D Printer fumes outside just in case.
    This is just One type of Venting system many more are available

    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1708681

  3. #3
    Thanks for the quick reply. So since the printer I ordered is closer, I can just open it outside to vent?

  4. #4
    Engineer-in-Training
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    Aug 2015
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    I have an anycubic... the fumes aren't horrible (smells like pancakes to me), but probably not super healthy to breath. There is a filter in the machine to mitigate it somewhat.

    If you have space for it in a bathroom (and a bathroom fan) that would be a solution... or you could vent it to the outside through a cracked window using a dryer hose (the machine already has a vent fan). There's one on thingiverse: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2877754

    If you have kitchen stovetop fan in your apartment, you could just set the printer on top of the stove and turn that fan on. It's a great printer, you'll enjoy it.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    and whatever you do wear gloves and absolutely do NOT SPILL ANY RESIN !

    Watched a few youtube videos on the pros and cons of resin machines.
    Decided I won't be getting one any time soon :-)
    so good luck !

  6. #6
    Engineer-in-Training
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    Quote Originally Posted by curious aardvark View Post
    and whatever you do wear gloves and absolutely do NOT SPILL ANY RESIN !

    Watched a few youtube videos on the pros and cons of resin machines.
    Decided I won't be getting one any time soon :-)
    so good luck !
    Resin printing isn't nearly as annoying as reviewers make it sound like... in fact i find it easier and less hassle than FDM printing.

    There are very few variables with resin printing: only one moving parts (two if you have a moving peeler), and only two settings to adjust (exposure time and layer height).

    Compare that to the amount of moving parts and the hundreds of interdependent settings on an FDM printer.

  7. #7
    If You do not have a good way to vent out the window, consider getting a fume extractor with a replaceable filter. It will allow You to get rid of the fumes and get back clean air, saving Your health in the long term.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    djprinter - it was actually the resin itself that put me off. Nothing to do with the mechanics of the machine :-)

  9. #9
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    @djprinter

    It sure is less hassling during the print, but it is post printing or any troubleshooting.

    If your resin happens to stain the galvo, you're done, nor having Form2 which solves nearly all of your problem, having PDMS layer lift, short life vat,etc. Manual cleaning is also messy as it tends to stain to skin, cloth. It's actually hard to clean it without using alcohol.
    Playing with ISP isn't safe either, it makes your skin dry and brittle on the long run and if lucky enough to get skin cancer.

    @OP, check the MSDS pretty sure some of them are labeled as carcinogenic on the long run.

  10. #10
    I will utilize an overflow when I have bolster on the bed that are just a couple (very little contact territory) I likewise set strong layers to 5 or 6 (S3D) with the goal that you get full layers at the base. Kapton (polymide) tape is the thing that I use on my glass, next to no issue with things not staying, all the more frequently can't get them off..

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