Close



Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    ATX psu broke my board rectifier ??

    So yeah, after successfully hooking up my anycubic kossel to an atx psu, I tried to hook my fusebox2 to the same psu. I took two yellow and black wires from the pcie connector and connect it to my mks gen L. Before turning on the psu I unplug my anycubic. Then I tried to turn on the psu, the lcd lit for a second then the wires start to smoke and the psu shuts down. I checked my board and found my rectifier was broken (S1A code diode). The board survived because it's still on when powered via usb.
    Anyone know why the rectifier broke? The voltage was 12v and everything was normal.

    I'll post images later if necessary.

  2. #2
    Engineer-in-Training
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    South Florida, USA
    Posts
    345
    Add AutoWiz on Facebook
    When I was installing an MKS gen L board on my GEEEtech prusa i3 I also installed the correct power supply in a 24v flavor. I went to 24v as I like to run the silent tmc2208 drivers in stealthchop2 as they have a lot more holding torque at 24v. And I must have shelled out 20 or 25 bucks on the proper part from ebay. I think I got 500watts just so it would heat up the 200x200 bed faster. On my Tevo Black Widow printer which is known for p.s. failures I went and bought a quality power supply. A 'Meanwell 600 se 24' power supply. This is slightly larger but still the same basic shape and connections as a 3d printer power supply. You should rejoice that today you have learned this important life lesson. which is A Place For Everything and Everything In It's Place! Next time you want to power a computer why not try using a 3d printer power supply. right? Use the right part for the job and you will always find success. And you know, moving forward maybe you shouldn't brag about trying to force your car key into your front door and breaking it.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by AutoWiz View Post
    When I was installing an MKS gen L board on my GEEEtech prusa i3 I also installed the correct power supply in a 24v flavor. I went to 24v as I like to run the silent tmc2208 drivers in stealthchop2 as they have a lot more holding torque at 24v. And I must have shelled out 20 or 25 bucks on the proper part from ebay. I think I got 500watts just so it would heat up the 200x200 bed faster. On my Tevo Black Widow printer which is known for p.s. failures I went and bought a quality power supply. A 'Meanwell 600 se 24' power supply. This is slightly larger but still the same basic shape and connections as a 3d printer power supply. You should rejoice that today you have learned this important life lesson. which is A Place For Everything and Everything In It's Place! Next time you want to power a computer why not try using a 3d printer power supply. right? Use the right part for the job and you will always find success. And you know, moving forward maybe you shouldn't brag about trying to force your car key into your front door and breaking it.
    A lesson learned indeed, still have no idea why it broke the rectifier. I've bought a replacement for the board and the rectifier too, though I wont plug the new board to the psu, hell no. But I will try to plug the old board (after the rectifier is replaced) to the psu. Will update after its done!

    P.s. Thanks for the wisdom and story

  4. #4
    I've had RAMPS go up in same fashion, screen flicker and smoke. Result was a blown 5V regulator on Arduino Mega, board still works when using USB. The reason for that was me connecting endstop switch between + and - on RAMPS by mistake and homing the printer -> short circuit. One reason to hate RAMPS, it's too easy to make that kind of mistakes since there's no safety features builtin... well it's cheap so what can you expect.

    ATX PSUs aren't a bad choice for 3D Printer, I have 2 of my printers running on ATX PSUs without problems. One of those even has the 5VSB and soft on/off implemented so the board itself runs from the PSU's 5V standby and 12V output can be controlled with gcode commands/Duet web UI. Been planning on implementing that to the other ATX powered printer so I could power Raspi and RAMPS from 5VSB and control 12V from Octoprint. It's also an safety feature because that would give me the ability to turn off my printers remotely if something goes wrong.

    Not sure about the idea to connect multiple printers to one PSU, in theory it should work as long as the power has enough juice to power both printers, but then again I'm not an electrical engineer so cannot say for sure.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by spegelius View Post
    I've had RAMPS go up in same fashion, screen flicker and smoke. Result was a blown 5V regulator on Arduino Mega, board still works when using USB. The reason for that was me connecting endstop switch between + and - on RAMPS by mistake and homing the printer -> short circuit. One reason to hate RAMPS, it's too easy to make that kind of mistakes since there's no safety features builtin... well it's cheap so what can you expect.

    ATX PSUs aren't a bad choice for 3D Printer, I have 2 of my printers running on ATX PSUs without problems. One of those even has the 5VSB and soft on/off implemented so the board itself runs from the PSU's 5V standby and 12V output can be controlled with gcode commands/Duet web UI. Been planning on implementing that to the other ATX powered printer so I could power Raspi and RAMPS from 5VSB and control 12V from Octoprint. It's also an safety feature because that would give me the ability to turn off my printers remotely if something goes wrong.

    Not sure about the idea to connect multiple printers to one PSU, in theory it should work as long as the power has enough juice to power both printers, but then again I'm not an electrical engineer so cannot say for sure.
    My atx psu is an 850watt seasonic psu, and one of my printer doesn't use a heatbed so I think its sufficient.

    The main reason I want to use the atx power supply is because it has 80+ platinum certification. Just trying to step up the efficiency

  6. #6
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    6,256
    80+ platinum certification.
    which means what exactly ?

    850 watts for a printer is overkill.
    but 12 volt should be 12 volt regardless.
    If you look for power supplies for led lights you can get some serious power for a lot less than a pc psu. They are exactly the same as printer psu's just cheaper if you buy them from led lighting suppliers.

    I have no idea what a rectifier is :-)

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by curious aardvark View Post
    which means what exactly ?

    850 watts for a printer is overkill.
    but 12 volt should be 12 volt regardless.
    If you look for power supplies for led lights you can get some serious power for a lot less than a pc psu. They are exactly the same as printer psu's just cheaper if you buy them from led lighting suppliers.

    I have no idea what a rectifier is :-)
    It means that the psu has more than 90% efficiency.

    Rectifier works like a diode it's used to rectify the electrons. So the electrons only go one way.

  8. #8
    Engineer-in-Training
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    South Florida, USA
    Posts
    345
    Add AutoWiz on Facebook
    Quote Originally Posted by curious aardvark View Post
    which means what exactly ? 850 watts for a printer is overkill. but 12 volt should be 12 volt regardless. If you look for power supplies for led lights you can get some serious power for a lot less than a pc psu. They are exactly the same as printer psu's just cheaper if you buy them from led lighting suppliers. I have no idea what a rectifier is :-)
    Have you ever looked at the label on the side of an atx power supply? I am keen to this because of the wild and extravagant gaming rigs I like to build. Like this: https://www.superchargerforums.com/t...-machine.7445/ For my gaming pc's I need to pay close attention to how many amps are available on the 12v rail. Because that advertised number of a max supported wattage is all of the rails and voltages, that is, all of the outputs together add up to a max of 850 watts of power. With an ATX power supply that must power 5v, 3.3v, and all other sorts of outputs and voltages and some of these watts are measured on the ground side, like -5v and -12v. So just because he says he is 850watts, don't you believe it. because 3dprinters, as you know, will only use the 12v rail. And these usually support noticeably less than the total rated output. But also 80 percent efficiency is awesome when you are only driving the rail you need, but 80 percent efficient on rails you don't even use is still a gross waste of power.
    Last edited by AutoWiz; 10-10-2018 at 06:11 PM.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    6,256
    so, in other words stick to a 12 volt psu for 12 volt printer.
    something like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Constant-Vo...ds=12v+led+psu
    Will probably give you a lot more power for a lot less money and all of it 12volt.

    Plus one psu per printer make smore sense - particularly if you add an on/off switch to the power cable.

    Having more than one printer on a single psu does seem a bit dodgy to me.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •