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  1. #11
    Engineer Roberts_Clif's Avatar
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    Jun 2017
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    Washington State, USA
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    Natural PLA is made from corn and is generally considered safe to use with food.

  2. #12
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    6,801
    yep.
    actually so is abs.
    Pretty much the first things I ever desinged and printed were sausage stuffer tubes in abs.
    6 years later, still using them.
    That was in the frustrating months before I discovered that people lied about pla being brittle and weak.

    Like everything that's in contact with food - wash it properly after use and it's fine.

  3. #13
    High Purity: PETG has low shrinkage rate, high transmittance, even print larger models perform well.

  4. #14
    PLA is food safe but PLA is too soft for hot beverages. The plastic will slowly flow at the normal temperatures. On the other side, The FDA considers PETG to be safe for food contact. PETG is very durable and more flexible than PLA.

  5. #15
    Student
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    Apr 2019
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    scotland
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    its allways good to refer to the manufacturer guidelines but there is a lot of things to take into mind

    Where is the printer
    is the printer in a dusty place is there particles flying around all of this can go into your printed part

    Print bed
    what is the print bed made out of

    Oil
    oil that is on your printer to help lubricate some parts could end up going on to the printed part

    there is a lot more to take into consideration
    https://www.inov3d.net/petg-3d-printer-filament

  6. #16
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    Jul 2014
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    PETG is very durable and more flexible than PLA.
    that depends almost entirely on print temperature.
    Print it at 220 - 235 and it's rigid and brittle.

    240 and above and it starts to toughen up.

    You still have to print it really slowly - which just annoys me :-)

  7. #17
    Technologist
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    162
    PETG likes 245 and you have to have your starting height and extrusion multiplier correct other wise you end up with brittle parts or over stringy parts. After my normal 2 walled square to check starting height and extrusion multiplier I print a 30x30mm 2 layer high solid square. There should be no space between the thread of plastic with good bonding between them. and when the extrusion output is correct, it will bend back and forth without snapping. I had a part that broke easier than I would have expected and thought it was a temperature issue.. but it was under extruded even though the 2 walled square measured correctly. Since that time I always print at least 1 layer of the 30x30 to make sure the threads are bonded to each other. For instance the other day, an extrusion multiplier of .90 made a correctly sized wall but the 2 layer square snap along extrusion lines.. at an extrusion multiplier of .92 the square could not be broken..

  8. #18
    Student
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    May 2019
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    Dongguan,China
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    3D printing is a kind of rapid prototype technology, which based on the digital model file. It use the powder metal or adhesive materials like plastic to construct the object by the way of step by step printing.

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