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  1. #21
    You may want to look into Taulman 910, easy to print and made for high strength part. Just started using it but liking it's ease of use and properties.
    Prints great in a .25 nozzle as as a .5.. just needs a machine that can safely achieve 255C on the hot end.

  2. #22
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    I tried eSun PLA+ filament and it's stronger than regular PLA, PETG, and ABS. I set extruder temp at 215 C, bed temp at 0 C, glass plate, and fan speed at 50% on my SainSmart Coreception printer.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bennylava View Post
    Ouch. Its starting to seem like most of the parts that you can print, are just going to be interior parts.
    That is not true. Here watch this awesome video from Teaching Tech: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lCqwA1h3JV4&t=

  4. #24
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    I found a model of three-speed automatic transmission at https://grabcad.com/library/gearbox-...transmission-1 but it was not made to be 3D-printed. The six-speed automatic transmission at https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1094616 was made to be 3D-printed but it was made for trucks, not cars. On that transmission, the blue and magenta parts are clutches that slide back and forth. The light green, dark yellow, and pink parts are bands that use levers to stop them from rotating. The three-speed transmission has very thin "wheels". I need to design a three-speed transmission with bands and clutches.

    large.jpg

  5. #25
    Hmm, this is a pretty tricky question. It seems to me that it is still too early to do this. Moreover, what do you say during maintenance or inspection? Read about it on this site https://www.general.com/blog/car-ins...-and-insurance, so it is a serious question. Therefore, I would only print some parts of the interior for now.

  6. #26
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    I'm trying to make scale models of real cars with working parts. I'm not making parts for real cars. In 1960s, there was Visible Auto Chassis with working transmission, working steering gear, one working brake drum, working suspension, etc BUT it was based on 1950s cars. One time, the Visible V8 Engine had electric "starting" motor and lights for spark plugs. Now, you have to turn the crank to make it run. There are newer engine kits such as ones for Ford Mustang and Hemi V8. On Thingiverse, EricThePoolGuy made working engines and working transmission for Toyota pickup truck. I really want to keep myself busy by making cars with working parts due to the virus that may kill us all.

  7. #27
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    3d printing also makes for great molds to use for making the carbon fiber parts with. Here is a cool video on making a carbon fiber intake manifold with the 3d printing to generate a mold: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-vOstYFhTQ&t=

  8. #28
    I think this thread got hijacked near the end here.

    My recommendation to you, would be to get a resin printer, I have both FDM (regular filament) and resin printers, I use both to make parts, actual end use parts whenever I can, a lot of times it's to make something temporary until a replacement can be gotten, but it keeps equipment running, so that's all we need.

    Regular filament printers will almost never come out looking like you want, the amount of fine tuning, orientation, trial and error, material settings and especially support are an absolute nightmare for smaller parts with intricate details, small surface areas or smaller overhangs, the printer will do great on flats and bridges but when you do a little section with a smaller surface area, it's too hot.

    I started using resin about 5 months ago and I love it, it's some more post processing a lot of times, sanding and painting if you want but the part will come out EXACTLY like the object you drew up in your software, apart from printing failures of course, there's no visible layer lines, overhangs print great and the parts are 100% solid, waterproof. Sand it, paint it and it will look like the original if done properly.

    Also, as mentioned already, scanners are not that great from what I've heard, you'll need to get effecient with 3D software to do anything worthwhile, Blender is a free software with a steep learning curve, I use Sketchup PRO and 3D Studio Max, that pretty much handles all my organic and inorganic modelling needs.

  9. #29
    I think that 3D printing is very helpful when you need a car part.I haven't used this yet, but many of my friends have used this method, and their feedback has been very good.For example, a plastic cap has worn off a friend's car. Assembling this unit will cost 200 dollars. The store did not disassemble the entire block to sell one small part. This is where 3D printing comes in. A friend just printed this detail.A great idea for a private workshop or service station.

  10. #30
    For parts that are not structural and small it can be helpful, assuming you have the ability to design the part from scratch. I just made a gasket for a rear wiper shaft where it passes through the rear window. This was made of TPU and the blue one is the first one, I have since reprinted in black. It does prevent water leak when hosed down with a water hose, so should keep out rain. This part is no longer available from Chrysler and I am thinking of putting this on Ebay as I would have been willing to pay $20 for something that worked had I not been able to roll my own.
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