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  1. #11
    Super Moderator Geoff's Avatar
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    I use Citrus cleaner, works much better than acetone (seriously, try it - get a citrus concentrate cleaner) turns the gunk into liquid and you wipe it off. Unless you like getting high off acetone, by all means then use acetone.
    Hex3D - 3D Printing and Design http://www.hex3d.com

  2. #12
    I will look this one up , you are right the fumes are terrible =)

  3. #13
    Super Moderator Geoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by galangel View Post
    I will look this one up , you are right the fumes are terrible =)
    just drop some onto the bed, let it sit there for about 30 seconds while it dissolves it and then wipe away, you won't even need elbow grease.
    Hex3D - 3D Printing and Design http://www.hex3d.com

  4. #14
    A metal razor blade will scratch the plate and create uneven heat distribution. Chipping away at the powder coat can also lead to rust. If you need a scraper, try using a plastic edge from a card instead. Turpenoid is odorless and will dry quickly without leaving any oily residue or citrusy smells. The magic eraser works great for cleaning off impossible dried up grease off pots and pans, and works just as good in cleaning up leftover 3M adhesive with some Turpenoid. While the instructions suggests to use water with the magic eraser, it's not what you want evaporating inside your 3D printer. There are tons of exposed wires and circuits that can easily short circuit. The problem with using acetone other than its heavy toxic odor is that you may inadvertently create an acetone bath inside the printer, melting the ABS or PLA already loaded in the extruder. 100% isopropyl alcohol would be a better option as its recommended to safely clean electronics.

  5. #15
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    Hi there,

    After following some of your advice, I've heated up the print bed to 100°C, unstick the 3D bed sticker easily and ended up having a bit of leftover glue. My first though was to try different solvent to see what would dissolve the glue. The first one I've tried and end up working was isopropyl alcohol. It easily dissolves the glue to a slimy mess that you can scrap off softly with a plastic or metal scrapper. I would recommend using paper towel soaked in alcohol or any clean rag you wouldn't mind throwing away after to soften and start diluting the glue, scrap it off when it's soaked and clean off the leftovers with a clean rag soaked in alcohol. Make sure you wear protective gloves, do it in a well ventilated area and of course, if you plan on doing this without removing the print bed assembly, make sure that you turn off the power and unplug the power cord from your flashforge. Isopropyl alcohol is highly flammable and its fumes may explode with an electrical spark or any flame source.

    Regards,

  6. #16
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    This thread helped me heaps. Thank you all for your ideas. Here's what I did:


    1. Heat the bed to around 100 degrees C and carefully (wear gloves or avoid touching the bed) peel off the old sticker (by lifting, not by rolling it back). This should leave only a minimum of adhesive behind. My first mistake was taking the sticker off when cold. I suspect that if I had tried it when hot, a lot more adhesive would have come off.
    2. Turn off the printer entirely, unplug it, and let it cool down. Put a bit of tape over the exposed electronics if you don't have a cover already in place.
    3. Liberally apply "Goof Off" (available from Bunnings if you're in Australia) all over the bed wherever there is adhesive. Be very careful not to get any drips on the electronics. Wait a minute or so.
    4. Wipe off with a "Chux" wipe or strong paper towel. If it doesn't wipe right off just add more liquid and rub it round a bit. The glue will come up in clumps. Keep going until completely clean and dry.
    5. Flatten any imperfections in the surface. In my case the aluminium (yes, that's how we spell it here!) had a gouge out of it (an altercation with a scraper) which left a ridge. A few seconds with a Dremel and the ridge was filed flat.
    6. Apply new sticker.
    7. Profit.


    Cheers

    Geoff.

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