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  1. #11
    Engineer-in-Training
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Northern Ohio
    Posts
    201
    What type of modeling? Free form surfacing, mechanical assembly modeling or basic shape creation? Most industrial designers that interface with mechanical engineers prefer solidworks. Higher end applications creo and catia. If you're doing basic stuff autodesk may provide more tutorials and an easier path to learning.

    Solidworks is pretty predominate in my region which is in the great lakes region for most small to mid sized companies and easy to use. It's parametric features are handy when doing assemblies where geometry of parts may change but clearances and relationships between features needs to be constant or equation based geometry like gear teeth. It would bemy reccomendation for a solid mid-level modeler.

  2. #12
    Engineer
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    441
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd-67 View Post
    What type of modeling? Free form surfacing, mechanical assembly modeling or basic shape creation? Most industrial designers that interface with mechanical engineers prefer solidworks. Higher end applications creo and catia. If you're doing basic stuff autodesk may provide more tutorials and an easier path to learning.

    Solidworks is pretty predominate in my region which is in the great lakes region for most small to mid sized companies and easy to use. It's parametric features are handy when doing assemblies where geometry of parts may change but clearances and relationships between features needs to be constant or equation based geometry like gear teeth. It would bemy reccomendation for a solid mid-level modeler.
    Thanks for the info. It really sounds like Solidworks is my best bet for what I really plan on doing I guess. I do quite a bit of modeling in smaller programs, like Tinkercad (It has a lot of great uses!) but when a customer asks me for a specific type of model being created with exact dimensions, and such, I end up having to outsource that modeling work to someone with some good software like that. Guess I'll have to acquire me a copy .

    Side note, I'm from Northern Ohio too. Up by Lorain county myself. How about you?

  3. #13
    Engineer-in-Training
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Northern Ohio
    Posts
    201
    In lorain county. North ridgeville to be exact. LCCC has courses in both creo (Mike Bratoli is an instructor, runs the CAD/PDM program for Moen) and Solidworks (Tony Hodos used to be a designer for Invacare).

    Accuracy wise i just printed some shaft adaptors on my creator pro for work from a solidworks model that were within .003 of the model on the diameter.
    Last edited by Todd-67; 01-24-2017 at 09:00 PM.

  4. #14
    Engineer
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    441
    Pretty crazy, small world. I'm right next door in Elyria, right down the street from North Ridgeville. I was actually just up at LCCC recently but apparently I couldn't do the Graphic Design program within the next year for some odd reason, and I qualify for a Pell Grant currently. Maybe I will head back up there and check out the Solidworks program. I remember seeing ''Introduction to Solidworks'' when I talked to the lady there.

    That's pretty good! I got 3 creator pro's myself, and a CTC pro that I may be trading soon for a vinyl cutter. I do pretty decent with my little 3D printing business I got going but I'm really trying to expand and make it a full time thing. I got the space in my Garage to set up something nice. What's the chances you teach lessons in Solidworks as well :P

  5. #15
    Engineer-in-Training
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Northern Ohio
    Posts
    201
    That is pretty funny. There is another member here that is local as well. I might be able to help you out a bit when i have time. I work too much lately... lol If you do take the class you qualify to buy the student version for cheap.

  6. #16
    OK here goes. I am 70 years old. I have had several strokes and I wand to get a 3d printer working to make a few ideas I have had working BEFORE I leave this earth. I have worked with several CADD programs and was making a living with AUTOCAD for 2 yrs but never made the transition to 3D When I used them none of them had 3D abilities.
    So what 3d printer soft ware is the easiest and cheapest to learn to make a 3d part?

    My other question is where is there a starter tutorial about 3D printing that will answer these questions? what about the different thypes of filiments and what bettere for what? flexing heat cold sunlight, etc.

    Is there a catalog designs out there in the public domain that I can prinf?

    Enough questions for now.

  7. #17
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    910
    If you have AtuoCAD experience I would check out Fusion 360. It is from AutoDesk also and will be rather familiar to more recent versions of AutoCAD. I can be had for free on either a student use or hobby/entrepreneur or small business.


    Quote Originally Posted by PRINTQUINCY View Post
    OK here goes. I am 70 years old. I have had several strokes and I wand to get a 3d printer working to make a few ideas I have had working BEFORE I leave this earth. I have worked with several CADD programs and was making a living with AUTOCAD for 2 yrs but never made the transition to 3D When I used them none of them had 3D abilities.
    So what 3d printer soft ware is the easiest and cheapest to learn to make a 3d part?

    My other question is where is there a starter tutorial about 3D printing that will answer these questions? what about the different thypes of filiments and what bettere for what? flexing heat cold sunlight, etc.

    Is there a catalog designs out there in the public domain that I can prinf?

    Enough questions for now.

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