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  1. #1

    3DMonstr: Large, quad-extruder 3D printer on Kickstarter

    Just saw this today. It's yet another 3D Printer trying to get funding on Kickstarter (http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...-extruder-3d-p). This one actually has some differences than a lot of the printers on the market today. This one is very large.

    The price starts at $2499, which isn't bad for a printer this size:

    How is 3DMonstr Unique?

    3DMonstr has many capabilities rolled into one powerful machine.
    • Its build volume is impressive. The smallest of its family is 1 cubic foot; the middle is 3.375 cubic feet, the largest is 8 cubic feet.
    • It has four independent extruders, each with its own temperature control
    • You can print small things on a big printer, but you can't print big things on a small one. That's why, whether you're printing large or small, we want to make sure that you could do so in fine resolution style, printing 40 micron layers.
    • The extruders are attached to the machine via a QuickMount release making it really easy to switch them in and out and trivial to adjust their height. Just drop the extruder to the glass and go.
    • 3DMonstr was built to last. It's like no 3D printer you've seen before. Made from industrial grade materials, it's incredibly sturdy and rigid. When people see this printer, they say, "Now this is serious."
    • 3DMonstr printers are designed for future growth and built to last through rapidly changing technology. We wanted to build a structure that could push the limits of what future technology can throw at it because we want to be able to print more than plastic. After Kickstarter is over and the machines have been delivered, our focus will be on advanced extruders. That's why we needed to make sure we had a structure that could handle strong materials and high thermal stress.
    • One of the biggest, ongoing frustrations and complaints of 3D printer users is the calibration process. It's not the kind of big we were going for, so we took the calibration solution a step further, and instead of trying to make calibration easier, we eliminated the problem by designing a large part of the problem right out of the printer.
    • A nice touch is that 3DMonstr is foldable. This way, if you don't have a large workspace, you can fold it flat and tuck it away. You can also quickly remove the gantry from the table bed for easy transport. It comes apart and can be put together with no tools, in just a couple of minutes.



    Quick Specs for 3DMonstr


    Size & Weight



    Mechanics


  2. #2
    What do you guys think? Worth the money?

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Geoff's Avatar
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    Nope sorry. Without an enclosure, there is no way it is going to print the height that it claims without serious warping issues or headaches. It looks gigantic and impressive but if you actually look at the printer in the picture, the big build is only around 22cm (look at the stepper motor, its around 4.2cm high, if you multiply the height in the photo by steppers, you can average around 20cm that the nozzle is currently at) and has not finished yet, so I'd be keen to see their 24" cubic build, like an entire helmet or something printed in one go.

    Also the build platform... Glass plate? no heating element? How on earth would they make a 24" high model without a heated bed and no enclosure? if it can this certainly is a magic machine!

  4. #4
    Super Moderator DrLuigi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    Nope sorry. Without an enclosure, there is no way it is going to print the height that it claims without serious warping issues or headaches. It looks gigantic and impressive but if you actually look at the printer in the picture, the big build is only around 22cm (look at the stepper motor, its around 4.2cm high, if you multiply the height in the photo by steppers, you can average around 20cm that the nozzle is currently at) and has not finished yet, so I'd be keen to see their 24" cubic build, like an entire helmet or something printed in one go.

    Also the build platform... Glass plate? no heating element? How on earth would they make a 24" high model without a heated bed and no enclosure? if it can this certainly is a magic machine!
    Well it could print PLA, but ye without heating element it will be still tricky :P

    for that price they could have been more complete.
    Also perhaps a few extra hotends attached.

  5. #5
    Seems like it's well on it's way to getting funded. Half way there with 33 days to go.

  6. #6
    Student 3dm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff View Post
    Nope sorry. Without an enclosure, there is no way it is going to print the height that it claims without serious warping issues or headaches. It looks gigantic and impressive but if you actually look at the printer in the picture, the big build is only around 22cm (look at the stepper motor, its around 4.2cm high, if you multiply the height in the photo by steppers, you can average around 20cm that the nozzle is currently at) and has not finished yet, so I'd be keen to see their 24" cubic build, like an entire helmet or something printed in one go.

    Also the build platform... Glass plate? no heating element? How on earth would they make a 24" high model without a heated bed and no enclosure? if it can this certainly is a magic machine!
    Just joined. Thanks for the feedback, Geoff - your Photogrammetry-Fu is pretty good, congrats :-) The machine you're looking at in that picture is the 12"x12"x12" prototype (T-Rex-12). So far, the tallest object we've printed on it is 10.5" - you can see it in some of the other pictures we've posted, it's that translucent vase. We have another .75" in this prototype, and the remaining .75" will be in the production machine. The longest object so far has been the Snake at a little over 13" (printed diagonally) - you can see it in the picture with 2 snakes. Let me know if you'd like me to post them here. Both were printed in PLA without any corners lifting or layer de-lamination associated with ABS. Since both of these prints achieved the state of thermal equilibrium a long time before finishing, they show that scaling them larger will work just fine. Of course, once we have the production machines up, we'll be showing that too.

    Re: heated bed: so far, we've been able to print relatively large objects without it. Granted we're testing with PLA, and ABS is a whole different kettle of fish. I totally agree that for ABS you absolutely need a heated bed. So the design allows for it both mechanically (there's enough space between the glass and the aluminum plate to place a heater and an insulator, and there's space in the Z-axis housing to run the moving cable) and electrically (the controller has the power MOSFET to run it and there's plenty of power in the 24V power supply to run it on the 12" machine). In fact, I have the actual heater for the T-Rex-12 prototype sitting on my desk.

    As some of the other large machine project also found out, the supply is rather thin for the heating pads of larger size. In fact, we couldn't find one for any sort of reasonable $$$. So we're looking to solve the problem our own way. I can't talk bout it yet, as we don't have the solution tested. But we are working on it, albeit at a lower priority than other tasks.

    Lastly, you mention heated enclosure. I agree that a controlled thermal environment would help for some materials and some builds. The large PLA builds we've done so far don't seem to be troubled by its lack. But ABS's layer de-lamination issues can certainly be helped by it. There are two major issues with including it into the design:
    1. Our machine folds - and it's a critical feature for us. We tried to include a folding enclosure, but quickly realized that doing a good job of it would delay the project by several months. We couldn't afford to do that. So we based on user feedback we decided to leave it out of this version of the machine. If enough people want it, we can work on it in the future.

    2. The Stratasys patents are hanging over us in this area. The recent events show that SSYS is going to be aggressive about its patents. We simply can't afford to be involved in this fight at this time. If you think this is not the right way to approach this market, please provide this feedback to SSYS and Makerbot. They're much more likely to listen to you, the Customer, then to me.

    The main reason we've not pushed hard on these two issues is that so far all the feedback we've had from the potential users is that PLA, HIPS, and Nylon are higher priority than ABS for them. So we've been told not to spend out time on this issue until later. Certainly before production machines go out the door, but not now. And we've followed that advice.

    I will consider this discussion as feedback going the other way, and fold it in accordingly. Again, thank you for your feedback. Please keep it up.

    Finally, we've just opened a separate forum here dedicated to our project. Please come and join us there: http://3dprintboard.com/forumdisplay...3DMonstr-Forum

  7. #7
    Student 3dm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrLuigi View Post
    Well it could print PLA, but ye without heating element it will be still tricky :P

    for that price they could have been more complete.
    Also perhaps a few extra hotends attached.
    Hi, DrL, see above for more detailed discussion about the PLA/ABS and heated bed/enclosure.
    I'm curious about what you mean by " a few extra hotends attached"? Can you please elaborate?

  8. #8
    Student 3dm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aWsomeABE View Post
    Seems like it's well on it's way to getting funded. Half way there with 33 days to go.
    From your lips to YourFavoriteDeity's ears! I very much hope so :-)

  9. #9
    Super Moderator DrLuigi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3dm View Post
    Hi, DrL, see above for more detailed discussion about the PLA/ABS and heated bed/enclosure.
    I'm curious about what you mean by " a few extra hotends attached"? Can you please elaborate?
    I meant to perhaps get a second Hotend on it so you can use 2 diffrent materials/colors etc.

  10. #10
    Student 3dm's Avatar
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    Hi, DrL, if I understand your suggestion correctly, our machines are specifically designed to do just that. You can mount up to 4 completely independent extruders on all our machines, each with its own autonomous temperature control. That means you can use up to 4 completely different materials. In the future, they won't even have to all be plastics.

    For example:
    - you can use an expensive, pretty, sparkly PLA filament for perimeters
    - a cheap plain PLA filament for structural infill
    - a PVA support filament
    - a conductive PLA filament as an RF shield

    Later next year, when we ship a low-temp paste extruder, you'll be able to add paraffin wax as ballast and/or filler to make the part differently stable then the normal weight distribution will allow. Or you could 3D print a composite hybrid rocket motor grain made of a combination of ABS and paraffin wax. If the current efforts to develop low-resistivity conductive filaments succeed, you'll be able to print wires right inside the structural components, as well.


    Multi-material printing is a very important capability for us, and we're working hard to make it available to as many Makers as possible.

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