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Thread: The Airy Arm

  1. #1
    Administrator Eddie's Avatar
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    The Airy Arm

    The Airy Arm is a device that provides users with the inability of moving their hand, this exact ability. It is 3D printed and utilizes cables that pull the fingers open and shut as the elbow bends and straightens. It allows for those with paralyzed hands to regain the use. It is developed by Elizabeth Jackson, a student of Jon Schull (e-NABLE founder). She is still working to improve the design but so far it works very well. Read more at http://3dprint.com/18459/3d-printed-airy-arm/

    Any ideas for improvements?

  2. #2
    Eddie, are there any videos of the arm in use available?

    Looks like someone tried to post one here, but the video doesn't appear to work: http://brainrecoveryproject.org/rese...th-hemiplegia/

    Thanks, John
    Last edited by johnbr; 10-12-2014 at 09:29 PM. Reason: clarify

  3. #3

    Where to download

    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie View Post
    The Airy Arm is a device that provides users with the inability of moving their hand, this exact ability. It is 3D printed and utilizes cables that pull the fingers open and shut as the elbow bends and straightens. It allows for those with paralyzed hands to regain the use. It is developed by Elizabeth Jackson, a student of Jon Schull (e-NABLE founder). She is still working to improve the design but so far it works very well. Read more at http://3dprint.com/18459/3d-printed-airy-arm/

    Any ideas for improvements?
    Greetings, Where can I find the .stl files for this device?

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Roxy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie View Post
    The Airy Arm is a device that provides users with the inability of moving their hand, this exact ability. It is 3D printed and utilizes cables that pull the fingers open and shut as the elbow bends and straightens. It allows for those with paralyzed hands to regain the use
    ...
    Any ideas for improvements?
    Wow! With sensors... And data logging capability... It is easy to see how this could help a person re-learn how to accomplish basic movements. And for that matter, help keep records of daily, weekly, monthly progress on what motion the person is able to make happen.

  5. #5
    The Felxy Hand 2 (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:380665) uses flexible plastic in the finger joints to create tension so that only 1 set of strings are necessary. When those strings release, the fingers automatically open because of the joints in the fingers. I wonder if there is opportunity to simplify the design here, reducing the number of strings used?

  6. #6
    Hello all, in anticipation of the Airy Arm being fully developed I was wondering what kind of 3d printer I would need to make this device. My 4 year old son, Leo had a stroke in utero and has limited use of his right side, I think this could help him. I have found that no matter how effective a device is, if its not comfortable a child will refuse to wear it. Some felt lining underneath the printed framing would make it more comfortable. Also, some way of protecting the cables from snagging on things is needed, maybe a fabric shroud or narrow gauge cable housing like on a bicycle.

  7. #7
    The video should work now. http://www.brainrecoveryproject.org/...th-hemiplegia/ The designer has modified the device since this video was taken. We'll have a blog post up soon with the new version.

  8. #8
    Yes, it is our hope that we will be able to crowdsource sensors and data logging capability. We're working on those issues on the side and are in need of app developers to help out. Anyone want to volunteer?

  9. #9
    Joe, right now the designer is working only on the mechanics of the arm. Once that's done, we will work on the profile, comfort, etc. as you mention. I believe that, ideally, it should fit more like a glove. We'd also like to incorporate sensors etc so that the child is reminded to use their arm, some vibration for proprioceptive input, etc. The current version, once finalized, would be printable at your local Office Depot (if it has a 3D printer) and you would assemble it yourself.

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