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  1. #11
    Technologist
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    145
    Not exactly, the reason a bigger printer should be slower is because it has a bigger, heavier gantry. This means lower accelerations, which means slower prints, particularly on prints with lots of small details. This is especially true with mendel (prusa) style printers which have particularly high moving mass because of moving the print bed. I was talking about different sized printers, not printers of the same make and model, and my point is they shouldn't have the same settings for different sized printers.

    You could set the accelerations/jerk/speed on a larger printer the same as a smaller printer, and they would print in more or less the same time, but you shouldn't. A larger printer with more moving mass should have lower accelerations/jerk/speed to avoid ringing artifacts. Nothing to do with the clock of the microcontroller.

  2. #12
    Trakyan, that makes sence.Thanks for the clear explanation.

  3. #13
    Yeah. As the guy said, a bigger printer is slower mainly due to the heavier gantry. But it is a lot more detailed!

  4. #14
    Technologist
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    145
    It's not more detailed. It has to be slowed down to stop it from /losing/ detail. The heavy gantry causes larger acceleration/deceleration forces which are what cause a lot of printing artifacts. On top of that a longer spanning gantry will be less rigid. You can lower speed and acceleration to compensate for the higher mass (more mass --> more acceleration/deceleration forces) and lower rigidity. But this is just to maintain print quality, not to make it better than a smaller printer.

    How detailed your print turns out is a function of your resolution and your accuracy/rigidity. All printers use basically the same motors, pulleys and belts so resolution is more or less the same. Accuracy and rigidity are related, a rigid machine means you can move more accurately (since the machine wont be wobbling, flopping and flexing around). Larger printers are less rigid usually because they are using parts intended for a smaller printer. You can make due with a less rigid printer by going slowing down and lowering the forces it has to deal with, but this won't give you better results, just 'not worse' ones.

    What big printers are good for though is large, single piece models. That being said, people usually post process models quite a bit by sanding/painting and gluing a few smaller parts together would add very little to the time spent in post process.

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