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  1. #1

    Lightbulb Which 3D Printer of these 3D Printers is right for me?

    EDIT: Just realized how badly worded the title is. Whoops

    Hello 3DPrintBoard,
    This is my first post here so I'm sorry if I'm breaking any rules by posting this here,
    I have a short list of 3D printers that I will buy in the future. My budget is around $800 but may be willing to go over, maybe. This is my first 3d printer but I have been wanting to get a 3D printer for over 4 years now, just haven't been able to until now.
    My main "thing" that I want from a printer is value, so I'm willing to spend $1000 on a printer that has more value than some $800 printer. I like delta printers but I have heard they have more problems than cartesian, so I am willing to hear the opinion of anyone on any of these printers.
    Thanks for any help you can provide

    Here are the printers:

    Monoprice Maker Plus, I like the value, but will need many upgrades such as mosfet and printing bed: https://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-Mak...ct_top?ie=UTF8


    Creality CR-10, I love the big build size, the value, and the price: https://www.amazon.com/Arrival-Creal.../dp/B01NBNI0US


    TEVO Little Monster, I do like the delta design but I heard it has problems compared to a traditional cartesian, also not many people have this printer: https://www.gearbest.com/3d-printers...?lkid=10934474


    D300vs DIY Kit, Insane value and I think it would be fun to build the printer: https://www.ultibots.com/d300vs-3d-printer-diy-kit/


    Monoprice Ultimate, great all around and decent value: https://www.amazon.com/Monoprice-Mak...88893643&sr=8-
    1&keywords=maker+ultimate&linkCode=sl1&tag=kevinst illerm-20&linkId=1bc175a5e5fca8f456e4831494542fe8


    Qidi Tech 1, I really like the full enclosure and dual extruders, not needed though, copy printing is nice for small parts: https://www.amazon.com/TECHNOLOGY-3D...e3dprinters-20
    Last edited by zakocsm; 09-22-2017 at 04:23 PM.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    I prefer deltas to cartesians. Simpler design, faster build speeds. easier to see what's going on, fewer moving parts.
    (currently have 2 cartesians and 1 delta with a custom made stupid sized delta under construction)

    out of that lot - tevo little monster - no question.
    larger build volume than the d300.

    That said I like all the build choices for the d300. (which is a delta) Neat direct drive extruder and I might borrow that hanging filament holder idea.
    The price is pretty high and you don't get a proper control panel.
    I can't stand cloud based crap or wifi only interface.
    Another thing with the d300 - all the parts are printed. This isn't necessarily a problem - but injection moulded does tend to be stronger and longer lasting. On the plus side you can make any broken parts.

    But if you put all the machines on that list on a table and said: 'take one: - the tevo little monster would be my choice.

  3. #3
    Technologist Roberts_Clif's Avatar
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    Hello Zakocsm

    I am A Hictop Fan myself, owning two a 3DP11/3DP12 install the latest firmware release of Marlin 1.1.5. so my first choose would be.

    Creality CR-10, the big build size, the value, and the price: Not only can it be built by almost anyone in a less than 1/2 hour it has one of the biggest build plates on you list.
    It appears to have a ever enlarging fan base making in one of the better selling machines on your list.

    Thou what ever your choice there will be someone in this forum that can assist you when you have questions.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by curious aardvark View Post
    I prefer deltas to cartesians. Simpler design, faster build speeds. easier to see what's going on, fewer moving parts.
    (currently have 2 cartesians and 1 delta with a custom made stupid sized delta under construction)

    out of that lot - tevo little monster - no question.
    larger build volume than the d300.

    That said I like all the build choices for the d300. (which is a delta) Neat direct drive extruder and I might borrow that hanging filament holder idea.
    The price is pretty high and you don't get a proper control panel.
    I can't stand cloud based crap or wifi only interface.
    Another thing with the d300 - all the parts are printed. This isn't necessarily a problem - but injection moulded does tend to be stronger and longer lasting. On the plus side you can make any broken parts.

    But if you put all the machines on that list on a table and said: 'take one: - the tevo little monster would be my choice.
    Thanks for the response aardvark. I really like the delta printers. I love the look and size of the TEVO little monster; especially the blue accents, I think that looks great, and it's probably one of the best printers on the list in terms of value, size and print speed. I'd still love to hear what everyone else has to say still.

  5. #5
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    Can't go wrong with the Qidis, X One for value, Tech 1 for dual extrude. Pretty much plug and play. Print volumes not huge but I personally don't have a need to make anything bigger... yet. Plus you can get them Amazom Prime in the states. Also for screaming value see the Klic-and-print in the other thread. $299 for all-metal dual extrude is insane. I'd say go with one of these first, start making stuff... and then add a delta later.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by raylo32 View Post
    Can't go wrong with the Qidis, X One for value, Tech 1 for dual extrude. Pretty much plug and play. Print volumes not huge but I personally don't have a need to make anything bigger... yet. Plus you can get them Amazom Prime in the states. Also for screaming value see the Klic-and-print in the other thread. $299 for all-metal dual extrude is insane. I'd say go with one of these first, start making stuff... and then add a delta later.

    I do like your idea of just getting one of the cartesians (QIDI Tech 1 for dual extruder) and getting a delta later, but I dont know if I will have the space or the money for another printer in the future, so I am still going to consider a delta. I also really like that its on amazon prime since I have that, and its about $600, which isn't at the top of my budget. Ill take a closer look tonight at the QIDI.
    Last edited by zakocsm; 09-22-2017 at 05:33 PM.

  7. #7
    https://www.seemecnc.com/products/ro...rinter-diy-kit
    This is also a pretty good option from what I've heard and is in the similar price range as the other deltas on my list.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    The rostock isn't a patch on the other two large deltas. Bear in mind the tft touchscreen is responsible for most of the advanced features. Print resume after power cut, better auto levelling, wifi connection etc.
    And they only cost $30.
    so avoid any delta that doesn't have one.
    Plus it's much smaller build volume than the other two.

  9. #9
    On a delta vs cartesian decision, I'd personally have to disagree with CA. Deltas are much harder to troubleshoot. If you want a delta to draw a line XXmm in length, you need three motors moving, diagonal rods being the right lengths, towers being evenly spaced and orthogonal and more. If your line doesn't turn out as intended it is much harder to troubleshoot just because there are so many factors going into it. On a cartesian printer, each axis is independent from the others and so it's much easier to troubleshoot and calibrate. This may be important for a beginner and for someone who needs rock solid reliability, like for a business or someone who wants to churn out mechanical parts consistently.

    As for the faster speeds, I think that's a feature of bowden systems and not deltas. Slap a heavier direct drive on a delta and watch those diagonal rods flop around at those high speeds. What I do love though is the stationary print bed, definitely a plus. You wont get as many ringing artifacts as cartesian printers that move the bed in the Y axis, or even those that cantilever it on the z axis.

    Basically, deltas are harder to troubleshoot when or if something does go wrong. This applies whether you're an expert or not, you wont be able to easily diagnose the issue. If your parts come out too big or too small or slightly crook, it wont be clear what the culprit is unlike on a cartesian. On the plus side they do look awesome and, while not a feature inherent of the motion system as people often associate it with, are usually built for fast print speeds. They're pretty appealing as a hobbyist or consumer. If you want something that is more rock solid and easier to troubleshoot, go for a Cartesian that moves the print head in X and Y. There is a reason industrial CNC machines of all sorts favor this design.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Trakyan View Post
    On a delta vs cartesian decision, I'd personally have to disagree with CA. Deltas are much harder to troubleshoot. If you want a delta to draw a line XXmm in length, you need three motors moving, diagonal rods being the right lengths, towers being evenly spaced and orthogonal and more. If your line doesn't turn out as intended it is much harder to troubleshoot just because there are so many factors going into it. On a cartesian printer, each axis is independent from the others and so it's much easier to troubleshoot and calibrate. This may be important for a beginner and for someone who needs rock solid reliability, like for a business or someone who wants to churn out mechanical parts consistently.

    As for the faster speeds, I think that's a feature of bowden systems and not deltas. Slap a heavier direct drive on a delta and watch those diagonal rods flop around at those high speeds. What I do love though is the stationary print bed, definitely a plus. You wont get as many ringing artifacts as cartesian printers that move the bed in the Y axis, or even those that cantilever it on the z axis.

    Basically, deltas are harder to troubleshoot when or if something does go wrong. This applies whether you're an expert or not, you wont be able to easily diagnose the issue. If your parts come out too big or too small or slightly crook, it wont be clear what the culprit is unlike on a cartesian. On the plus side they do look awesome and, while not a feature inherent of the motion system as people often associate it with, are usually built for fast print speeds. They're pretty appealing as a hobbyist or consumer. If you want something that is more rock solid and easier to troubleshoot, go for a Cartesian that moves the print head in X and Y. There is a reason industrial CNC machines of all sorts favor this design.
    I do love the looks of deltas, and since I have been in the tech and 3d printing world for many years I doubt there is something I couldn't fix, but that's the problem, I don't really know...

    The fast print speed and large bed size of most of them is really nice for me since I'm going to need to print larger parts and a good amount of them, but I don't like the reliability and troubleshooting issues that comes with those perks. With a bit of research and parts I bet I could fix most problems on deltas.

    I'm probably going to be going for a Klic-N-Print and Delta combo (2 printers) so that I can get dual extrusion on the KlicNPrint and just so I can print multiple parts at once with 2 printers.
    Thanks for the info Trakyan.

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