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  1. #11
    Staff Engineer
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    Quote Originally Posted by neuo View Post
    ive sent the an email the good thing that they reply fast https://youtu.be/3VuS8ppiEwc they have sent me this video and they say the could build on custom size as i order the only thing the extruder look too small for printing a building the only thing i couldnt figure it out is it continuous flow of cement or it stops in some place and if im building one how i can control the concrete pump to stop pumping on the specified areas if theres any one with experience in controlling the concorete pump through the controller that would be very helpful.

    and for the BetAbram ive sent them an email like a week ago still no reply from them if you know how to contact them or if i can get a quote for the 3D printer and how to order it

    Thanks alot for the reply
    [I'd suggest you hold onto your money for now and read up on concrete printing for a while. It seems that you've got a lot to learn about it. If you got a system with a concrete pump, you'd want to stop the pump while the machine was paused. Electrical relays can do that on a low-voltage signal from the controller. What's really crucial about printing in concrete is the mixture used. Most concrete will slump to some degree; if it's not being pumped into a form, then you need a mixture that will support itself without slumping at all. Something like that will be hard to dispense with a normal concrete pump, which is designed for a liquid mixture. You'd need something more like a piston (which would need periodic refilling), or a heavy-duty peristaltic pump]

  2. #12
    Engineer Marm's Avatar
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    Like I said, Plywood, hammer, and nails, and you can "print" all the concrete you want.

  3. #13
    thanks all for the reply and for what im trying to achieve this is example chair and for the future some furniture keep in mind i would like if the chair is not heavy and it can support a human weight so i figured the only option is 3d printing since i want the inside partially filled
    aa chair.jpg

    thanks

  4. #14
    Engineer ralphzoontjens's Avatar
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    Neuo, unless you're doing custom pieces why not go for the casting route?
    You can create a rubber mold for far less initial investment costs than 3D printing, plus a faster cycle time and much smoother detail fit for your design.
    Use a wooden master model that you can even make by hand.
    You will need a positive mold piece as well. And for hollowing out I am thinking CNC'd foam inserts that you suspend in the mold.

  5. #15
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    If light and strong is what you're looking for in a chair, concrete is the last material you'd want to use. It seems like those designs would work well in some kind of foam, which can be cast in a mold. If you want to use 3D printing in this project, use it to print the mold in sections that can be bolted together. Here's an example of a chair made that way: http://www.jorislaarman.com/work/arm-chair/

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