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  1. #1
    Student DRAFTStudio's Avatar
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    Best scanner for capturing a motorcycle?

    I'm looking for a scanner that can accurately capture areas of a motorcycle for custom part development. What's most important is that the tolerance is tight enough to capture mounting points and curvature of high gloss painted parts so that the new parts mount up seamlessly.

    Hoping to stay under the $2k mark if possibly. Many of the scanners I'm finding are not good at capturing reflective surfaces or sharp edges.

    Anybody have any recommendations?

    Thanks,
    Dave

  2. #2
    Technologist
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    There aren't many 3D scanners that can scan shiny reflective surfaces, they all need a dull even colored surface for the best result,
    There are some spray-cans that spray a dull grey/white surface, that can be wiped off afterwards without any damage to the surface,
    or Chalk spray-can, some have had some good results with that.

    Most if not all 3D scanners have a lot trouble with sharp corners, you always need to post-process the scanning data if you want to make a accurate copy of the object.
    with your budget, the Einscan-S is your best bet, or add a little more and go for the Einscan Pro,
    but don't forget you need a good PC to handle the large files

    Have look here:
    http://3dprintboard.com/showthread.p...r-scans-here-!

    http://3dprintboard.com/showthread.p...st-showing-off

  3. #3
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    what you will probably realise is that it's usually quicker and simpler to actually model the file from scratch.

    The hand held scanners used in industry tedn to start at $20,000 and steadily work their way upwards from there.
    That's what you actually need to do the job properly.

    I don't know if anyone out there offers a scanning service or rents out industrial handheld scanners - but that's the initial route I would personally investigate.
    As mentioned the einscan is pretty much the only handheld and desktop scanner within your budget. The desktop scans I've seen from it are pretty impressive. I've not seen any handheld scans of larger items though, so can't comment on that side of things.

    My advice would be to try and rent an industrial unit to see if it actually does what you want it to.

  4. #4
    Technician
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    It might slightly overrun your budget, but I would take this one:
    http://www8.hp.com/us/en/campaign/3D.../overview.html

    Very precise and a lot of open options to manipulate your scans.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    isn't the einscan almost idemntical to the david systm ?

    Might be worth looking at the scanify unit as well. http://www.desktop3dprinter.com/3d-s...d-scanner.html
    Pretty much just a handheld unit. Supposed to be quite good and realistically the cheapest unit that might do the job.
    Last edited by curious aardvark; 01-03-2017 at 11:01 AM.

  6. #6
    Technologist
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    David system is maybe a little better then the Einscan-Pro but is a lot of work to setup properly,
    The Scanify is not really accurate, and stitching scans is based on a subscription setup, more stitching, more pay

    But don't just look for a scanner. the software is even more important to get good accurate and closed scans, manually adjusting scans to fit is a long and tedious job that still could not guarantee good results.
    that's why I chose the Einscan, the software stitching is fats and very easy.

    Be careful about choosing a scanner, you need at least 0.1mm or smaller accuracy to get the detail you want for motor parts,
    some manufactures don't really mention the accuracy or use fancy words to describe blobs
    Last edited by This; 01-03-2017 at 12:03 PM.

  7. #7
    Technician
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    #This
    I would disagree about David have a lot of work to calibrate it properly.
    It is different kind of approach to calibration, but not difficult at all.
    Anyone can learn how to do it very properly very shortly.
    But I would agree - software itself is more important then HW.
    And here i would choose David (not it is HP company now).
    A lot of smart options, intelligent integrated into software itself is amazing.
    Einscan is not bad, but doesn't give you accuracy & flexibility as David does.
    Even with entry level of SLS2.

    I did some scans of auto-part parts for similar purpose like it is question here - make another part.
    Depend on surface you are scanning of course, but I manage to make even models for replication with David scanner and without much post processing.

  8. #8
    Engineer
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    For motorcycle parts, even a good high-resolution scan is just the start of the process. You'd use that as the basis for a reverse-engineering job that would give you the clean, accurate CAD model you'll need for reproducing a part which will actually fit.

  9. #9
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    Add CarterTG on Thingiverse
    Back when they were in beta, I tried RhinoPhoto. Basically, photogrammetry using stick-on targets.

    Initially, I struggled, but their techs diagnosed the problem to the dSLR lens I was using. Turned out it had serious chromatic aberration at the edges that I never noticed up till then. It threw off the ability to properly read (& compare) the targets.

    Retrying the process with a prime lens, RhinoPhoto worked as advertised and I was capturing super-precise point clouds to model against. The software would print a sheet of targets (presuming you'd feed an adhesive-backed sheet). The targets could be fingernail-sized for smaller objects or scaled up for folks slapping them onto boat hulls. Looking through their store these many years later, they're selling something described as PVC sheets... guessing they might be cling-on vinyl sheets which would solve any silly requirements about dulling shiny or transparent surfaces.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator curious aardvark's Avatar
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    just had alook and the biggest drawback i can see to rhino photo is that it's purely an add-in for Rhino - which is a pretty expensive bit of software in it's own right. Buying both rhino and rhino photo would be a lot more expensive than just buying a david or einscan scanner.

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